It Became Known In What Weather The Greater The "radius Of Damage" For Coughing And Sneezing

Table of contents:

It Became Known In What Weather The Greater The "radius Of Damage" For Coughing And Sneezing
It Became Known In What Weather The Greater The "radius Of Damage" For Coughing And Sneezing

Video: It Became Known In What Weather The Greater The "radius Of Damage" For Coughing And Sneezing

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: On the mathematics of sneezing and coughing -- how far should you be social distancing, really? 2023, February
Anonim

It became known in what weather the greater the "radius of damage" for coughing and sneezing

New evidence suggests that keeping a distance of 1–2 meters may not be enough to prevent infection. They also emphasize the need to wear a mask in public.

It became known in what weather more
It became known in what weather more

Photo: CC0 Public Domain

When a person coughs or sneezes, small droplets escape from the respiratory tract. These drops may contain disease-causing viruses, including SARS-CoV-2. An international team of physicists have learned that cool weather and high humidity create the best conditions for their propagation. A new study on the influence of weather factors on the spread of infection is published in the journal Physics of Fluids.

To better understand the role of weather in the spread of respiratory droplets, scientists have developed special mathematical models. In a press release from the University of California, the new study is linking social interactions between humans and fluid physics.

“The physics of drops is highly dependent on the weather. If you are in colder, wetter climates, droplets after sneezing or after coughing will persist and move in the air longer than in hot, dry climates, where they evaporate more quickly. We have incorporated these parameters into our model of infection spread,”said Professor Abhishek Saha of the University of California San Diego, co-author of the study.

The study showed that at a temperature of 35 ° Celsius and 40% relative humidity, a droplet can "leave" almost 2.5 meters. At a temperature of 5 ° and a humidity of 80%, this distance will be over 3.5 meters.

The authors found that medium droplets (14-48 microns) are the most dangerous. Smaller ones can evaporate in fractions of seconds, while larger ones quickly fall.

Scientists believe that this is further evidence of the need to wear masks that effectively stop drops of the "most dangerous" size. Also, new data emphasize that compliance with the recommendations of a distance of 1-2 meters is an insufficient measure to prevent airborne infections.

Popular by topic