In The US, The Rules For Vaccination Against HPV Have Changed

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In The US, The Rules For Vaccination Against HPV Have Changed
In The US, The Rules For Vaccination Against HPV Have Changed

Video: In The US, The Rules For Vaccination Against HPV Have Changed

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Video: Mayo Clinic Minute: HPV Vaccine Prevents Cancer 2023, February
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In the US, the rules for vaccination against HPV have changed

The age criteria for the first vaccination have expanded, the recommendations for adults have changed.

In the US, the rules for vaccination against HPV have changed
In the US, the rules for vaccination against HPV have changed

Photo: Gustavo Fring / Pexels

The American Cancer Society has updated guidelines for HPV vaccination. Published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. The updates to the guidelines focused primarily on three issues: the age of initiation of vaccination, the need for catch-up vaccinations, and the challenge of vaccination at age 27-45.

Previous recommendations told doctors that children should receive their first HPV vaccinations at age 9-10. New guidance says the optimal vaccination age for boys and girls is 9-12 years. Scientists suggest that expanding the age range will lead to increased vaccination coverage.

“There is evidence that starting vaccination at age 9-10 is potentially more effective in preventing cancer than starting at age 11-12. Therefore, we find it important to point out that starting vaccinations at 9-10 years of age helps to maximize the benefits,”explains Debbie Saslow, co-author of the guide.

Catch-up vaccination is recommended for all people under 26 who have not received the vaccine earlier. The guidelines state that this vaccination (aged 22-26) will prevent fewer cancers than routine childhood vaccinations.

HPV vaccination is not recommended for people over 26 years of age. Previously, at the age of 27-45 years old, it was suggested to make a choice in consultation with a doctor. But now scientists point out that vaccination at this age is too low, and mechanisms for determining the groups who will benefit from the vaccine have not been developed.The authors recall that the combination of HPV vaccination and screening for cervical cancer has enormous preventive potential. According to them, mass vaccination of children aged 9-12 years should eventually lead to a reduction in the number of cancers of the cervix, pharynx, anus and vulva by more than 90%.

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