Scientists Have Described Cases Of Voluntary Consumption Of Low-quality Food

Table of contents:

Scientists Have Described Cases Of Voluntary Consumption Of Low-quality Food
Scientists Have Described Cases Of Voluntary Consumption Of Low-quality Food

Video: Scientists Have Described Cases Of Voluntary Consumption Of Low-quality Food

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: IB Geography: Possible solutions to food insecurity + CASE STUDY 2023, January
Anonim

Scientists have described cases of voluntary consumption of low-quality food

The consequences of refusing food of questionable quality in certain situations can be worse than the consequences of taking such food

Scientists have described cases of voluntary consumption of low-quality food
Scientists have described cases of voluntary consumption of low-quality food

Photo: CC0 Public Domain

Everyone knows the main signs of foods not worth eating. Danger can be carried by undercooked or undercooked meat, moldy bread and more. Norwegian scientists argue that in certain cases we can consciously eat such food. Their work is published in Risk Analysis.

In their analysis, the scientists included 17 different situations in which people can potentially fear not eating food that is being served. The greater the social consequences of the situation, the more likely it is that a person can eat poor-quality food.

It turned out that the greatest pressure can be felt at dinner with the parents of the future wife or future husband. Another situation where people may not refuse to eat low-quality products is an important party at the boss.

“We can imagine that in certain situations, the expected cost of giving up food is weighed against the expected cost of being considered impolite,” Nina Veflen, a professor at the Norwegian Business School and co-author of the study, quoted CNN.

Betflen points out that social consequences are not the only ones at play. Empathy is of some importance. The second in terms of pressure, scientists recognized the situation when the 13-year-old daughter served a dish that she had prepared herself.

The study involved about 1900 residents of Norway. They were given the names of various foods (with a mention of the degree of their freshness) and asked if they could eat them in a certain social situation.

The authors of the work believe that the results of the study can be projected to many other countries, adjusted for some cultural differences.

Popular by topic