Even Minor Head Injuries Can Contribute To Depression

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Even Minor Head Injuries Can Contribute To Depression
Even Minor Head Injuries Can Contribute To Depression

Video: Even Minor Head Injuries Can Contribute To Depression

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Video: Brain Injury and Depression 2023, January
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Even minor head injuries can contribute to depression

Recurrent blows, including those that are not accompanied by concussion and loss of consciousness, are potentially dangerous.

Even minor head injuries can contribute to depression
Even minor head injuries can contribute to depression

Photo: CC0 Public Domain

Even minor head injuries can contribute to depression and poor brain function if repeated over and over again. This is evidenced by a new study published in Neurology.

Scientists from Boston and San Francisco analyzed medical records of more than 13,000 patients. 5% of them had a history of repeated head injuries - as a result of sports, military service, beatings. Separately, scientists focused on the consequences of minor injuries - which were not accompanied by loss of consciousness and concussion.

The study participants underwent tests of the state of cognitive functions. Also, scientists evaluated how severe their symptoms of depression are. Both single traumatic brain injury (TBI) and repetitive minor head injuries were associated with increased depression compared to those in people who did not bang their heads.

When single TBIs and repetitive blows to the head were considered separately, the latter were found to have a worse effect on the risk of depression and its course.

"It should be added that this relationship is likely to be related to the number and duration of repeated blows to the head, but we did not have enough information to investigate," said Michael Alosco, professor at the Boston University School of Medicine. Medicine).

The association between minor head injuries and symptoms of depression appeared to be dose-dependent. For example, after a single trauma, people were less likely to develop depression compared to those who had a more severe history of trauma during their lifetime.

The authors clarify that not all people who experience repeated head injuries develop cognitive impairment and depression. But this study highlights that in people who regularly experience minor injuries (such as athletes), they play a significant role in subsequent mental changes.

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