Regular Late Dinner Can Threaten The Development Of Diabetes And Obesity

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Regular Late Dinner Can Threaten The Development Of Diabetes And Obesity
Regular Late Dinner Can Threaten The Development Of Diabetes And Obesity

Video: Regular Late Dinner Can Threaten The Development Of Diabetes And Obesity

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Regular late dinner can threaten the development of diabetes and obesity

Scientists have evaluated the change in metabolism in humans at different times of dinner

Regular late dinner can threaten the development of diabetes and obesity
Regular late dinner can threaten the development of diabetes and obesity

"Dinner at Emmaus", Caravaggio, 1601. Photo: CC0 Public Domain

A late dinner increases your risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity. In a small study, the researchers examined in detail the metabolism of those who eat after 10 pm. Scientific work published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

“This study provides new data on how a late meal impairs glucose tolerance and reduces the amount of fat the body can burn. The effect of eating late can vary significantly among individuals, depending on what time they usually go to bed. That is, some people may be more vulnerable to the effects of late dinner,”said Jonathan C. Jun of Johns Hopkins University, co-author of the study.

Jun added that, with the regular impact of late dinners, over time, such a meal can lead to consequences such as diabetes and obesity.

The study involved 20 healthy volunteers (10 men and 10 women). The authors focused on how metabolism occurs in people who ate after 10 pm, and compared it to the metabolism of those who dined at 6 pm. All study participants went to bed at 11 pm.

The study showed that people who ate later had higher blood glucose levels (on average by 18%), and also more fat consumed remained unbroken (the index increased by 10%). These readings did not depend on the number of calories: the experimental portions were always the same.

Scientists believe that similar changes recorded in healthy people with normal weight may be more pronounced in obesity, since metabolism is already impaired with it.

Participants in the study wore exercise trackers and had blood tests done every hour during the experiment. They underwent a scan of the body's adipose tissue, and to control the breakdown of fat, their food was labeled with non-radioactive isotopes.

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