MRI Of The Brain Of A Patient With A Loss Of Smell Against The Background Of COVID-19 Did Not Reveal Pathologies

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MRI Of The Brain Of A Patient With A Loss Of Smell Against The Background Of COVID-19 Did Not Reveal Pathologies
MRI Of The Brain Of A Patient With A Loss Of Smell Against The Background Of COVID-19 Did Not Reveal Pathologies

Video: MRI Of The Brain Of A Patient With A Loss Of Smell Against The Background Of COVID-19 Did Not Reveal Pathologies

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Video: COVID-19 & the Loss of Smell and Taste 2023, February
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MRI of the brain of a patient with a loss of smell against the background of COVID-19 did not reveal pathologies

The parts of the brain that are responsible for smell were not damaged. But scientists do not exclude that further research may detect pathology in the brain.

MRI of the brain of a patient with a loss of smell against the background of COVID-19 did not reveal pathologies
MRI of the brain of a patient with a loss of smell against the background of COVID-19 did not reveal pathologies

Photo: pixabay.com

Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, doctors have repeatedly reported that loss of smell (anosmia) and taste is a symptom of this infection. Recently, doctors reported that anosmia with a new coronavirus infection appears much more often than with flu and colds.

Viral diseases are the most common cause of loss of smell. The most common cause of anosmia is nasal congestion and swelling of its mucous membranes. It usually goes away with the rest of the cold symptoms. Persistent loss of smell can also occur with COVID-19. Its mechanisms have been poorly understood.

A group of Iranian scientists, who published their research in Academic Radiology, wanted to know if COVID-19 anosmia is accompanied by damage to the olfactory bulb (the part of the brain to which the olfactory nerves transmit signals) and the olfactory tract (nerve fibers that go deeper into the brain). To do this, they used magnetic resonance imaging.

On the MRI images, the olfactory bulb was of normal volume, the intensity of the image of the bulb and the olfactory tract was also normal. These findings are consistent with data from 2002-2003 studies, which showed no change in anosmia associated with SARS.

Scientists say that in order to ensure the integrity of the olfactory bulb during anosmia in the presence of COVID-19, these results will need to be verified in the future using other methods, such as single-photon emission computed tomography. In addition, a more objective picture will be provided by a study of patients with loss of smell at different stages of COVID-19.

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