Scientists Have Calculated How Often To Be Screened For Cervical Cancer

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Scientists Have Calculated How Often To Be Screened For Cervical Cancer
Scientists Have Calculated How Often To Be Screened For Cervical Cancer

Video: Scientists Have Calculated How Often To Be Screened For Cervical Cancer

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Video: Behind the Science: Cervical Cancer Screening 2023, January
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Scientists have calculated how often to be screened for cervical cancer

A new study found that screening for cervical cancer should be done once every three years. With such a frequency, he is able to prevent most of the cases of this disease. More frequent screening has no additional benefit.

Scientists have calculated how often to be screened for cervical cancer
Scientists have calculated how often to be screened for cervical cancer

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A new study found that screening for cervical cancer should be done once every three years. With such a frequency, he is able to prevent most of the cases of this disease. More frequent screening has no additional benefit. The new data was published in the International Journal of Cancer.

“Cancer screening works. Most women who develop cervical cancer simply have not been screened or done too rarely,”said Professor Cosette Wheeler of the University of New Mexico, lead author of the study.

Scientists have compared rates of cancer incidence and screening data for cervical cancer (HPV-pap test, which detects abnormal cells and the content of human papillomavirus in them) in the US state of New Mexico. Scientists were able to analyze the history of screening of those women who developed cervical cancer.

The authors compared the incidence rates of cervical cancer in women of the same age, nationality, and similar places of residence (urban or rural). It turned out that 61% of women who did not have cervical cancer were screened within three years. Only 38% of women diagnosed with cancer were screened during the same time period.

Scientists have shown that women whose screening results are negative have a very low chance of developing cervical cancer within 3.5-5 years. Wheeler notes that HPV infections often go away on their own, but the immune system takes time to act.

The researchers concluded that more frequent screening does not provide additional benefits. The authors point out that the value of negative screening is enormous. He points out that the risk of metastatic cancer in the coming years is 80% lower, and local cancer by 50%.

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