Living Near Major Roads Increases The Risk Of Developing These Neurological Diseases

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Living Near Major Roads Increases The Risk Of Developing These Neurological Diseases
Living Near Major Roads Increases The Risk Of Developing These Neurological Diseases
Video: Living Near Major Roads Increases The Risk Of Developing These Neurological Diseases
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Living near major roads increases the risk of developing these neurological diseases

People who live near major roads and highways have an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Scientists attribute this to exposure to polluted air. They published their findings in the journal Environmental Health.

Living near major roads increases the risk of developing these neurological diseases
Living near major roads increases the risk of developing these neurological diseases

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People who live near major roads and highways have an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Scientists attribute this to exposure to polluted air. They published their findings in the journal Environmental Health.

Scientists from the University of British Columbia analyzed information on 678,000 residents of the Metro Vancouver area in Canada, aged 45 to 84 years. According to the findings, living within 50 meters of major roads is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's and other types of dementia. The authors suggest that this is due to high levels of air pollution.

Research has shown that living near parks and other green spaces has a protective effect, reducing the likelihood of neurological pathologies.

In the study, scientists assessed the proximity of people to the roads, the level of pollution in each area, the level of noise and the presence of parks near the place of residence. They correlated these findings with the incidence of neurological diseases.

Scientists have been able to demonstrate the link between pollution and disease only for Parkinson's disease and dementia. They believe that such evidence for multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease has not been obtained due to the low incidence in the area. More research will be needed to clarify these data.

One of the important findings of the study was that the presence of parks near residential areas reduces the degree of harmful effects of polluted air.

“People who have access to green spaces are more likely to be physically active, they have more social interactions. These are probably the most obvious benefits,”said Michael Brauer, study co-author.

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