HPV Vaccination Does Reduce The Risk Of Cervical Cancer

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HPV Vaccination Does Reduce The Risk Of Cervical Cancer
HPV Vaccination Does Reduce The Risk Of Cervical Cancer

Video: HPV Vaccination Does Reduce The Risk Of Cervical Cancer

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Video: Mayo Clinic Minute: HPV Vaccine Prevents Cancer 2023, February
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HPV vaccination does reduce the risk of cervical cancer

Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) results in a significant reduction in the prevalence of precancerous lesions of the cervix in young women. This should help reduce the incidence of cervical cancer in the future.

HPV vaccination does reduce the risk of cervical cancer
HPV vaccination does reduce the risk of cervical cancer

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Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) results in a significant reduction in the prevalence of precancerous lesions of the cervix in young women. This should help reduce the incidence of cervical cancer in the future. The new study was conducted in New Zealand and published in the New Zealand Medical Journal.

HPV is the main cause of precancerous changes and cervical cancer. The modern quadrivalent vaccine provides protection against four types of HPV - the most dangerous and common.

New research shows that HPV vaccination has led to a significant reduction in precancerous lesions of the cervix, especially in those vaccinated before the age of 18.

“We expect this to lead to a decrease in cervical cancer rates among these women as they age,” said study leader Carrie Innes.

The study involved 104,313 women. According to the screening results, in women who received at least one dose of HPV vaccine of the four types by the age of 18 years, the prevalence of precancerous lesions at the age of 20-24 was 31% lower than in unvaccinated participants. In cases of vaccination after 18 years, there was a relatively small reduction in the risk of precancerous changes.

The study confirms that HPV vaccination provides protection against cervical cancer, “but it also demonstrates that both vaccinated and non-HPV-vaccinated women can develop high-grade cervical lesions. This underscores the need for cervical screening among both HPV and non-HPV vaccinees,”noted co-author Peter Sykes.

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