White Bread And Sausage Increase The Risk Of Permanent Eye Damage With Age

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White Bread And Sausage Increase The Risk Of Permanent Eye Damage With Age
White Bread And Sausage Increase The Risk Of Permanent Eye Damage With Age
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White bread and sausage increase the risk of permanent eye damage with age

Scientists have learned which foods predominate in the diet may increase the risk of age-related macular degeneration, an irreversible and vision-threatening disease. These include red and processed meats, refined grains, and high-fat dairy products.

White bread and sausage increase the risk of permanent eye damage with age
White bread and sausage increase the risk of permanent eye damage with age

Photo: pixabay.com /

Scientists have learned which foods in the diet may increase the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Its likelihood is tripled in people who frequently eat red and processed meats, refined grains, and high-fat dairy products.

The macula (macula) is the area of ​​the retina that is responsible for the most acute vision. Age-related degeneration (macular degeneration) is a common cause of central vision loss. Because of its violation, people lose the ability to drive a car, read, recognize faces.

The authors of the new study, which was published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology, point out that treating age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is difficult, expensive, and often impossible. Therefore, its prevention is very important.

The risk of developing AMD increases the so-called Western eating habits. It is characterized by the consumption of large quantities of red and processed meat, refined grains and fatty dairy products. At the same time, this diet was not associated with the development of the early form of the disease.

Scientists analyzed data from a large study that examined the risk of developing atherosclerosis. The participants were followed for 18 years, and their food preferences were monitored from 1987 to 1995. The authors identified two generalized types of diet that the study participants followed: Western and healthy.

“In the study, we found that people who did not have AMD or had early AMD at the start of the study and who ate unhealthy foods were more likely to develop advanced vision-threatening disease after 18 years,” Amy said. Millen (Amy Millen), assistant professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo, co-author of the study.

So far, only studies have been conducted on the relationship between individual nutrients and macular degeneration. For example, high amounts of antioxidants in food have been known to protect against disease.

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