Caesarean Section Does Not Increase A Child's Risk Of Obesity

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Caesarean Section Does Not Increase A Child's Risk Of Obesity
Caesarean Section Does Not Increase A Child's Risk Of Obesity

Video: Caesarean Section Does Not Increase A Child's Risk Of Obesity

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Video: Study debunks notion that C-section would increase risk of obesity in offspring 2023, January
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Caesarean section does not increase a child's risk of obesity

The new scientific work refutes the results of a number of small studies that have argued that a caesarean section increases the risk of obesity in a child. It turned out that earlier scientists did not take into account some important factors.

Caesarean section does not increase a child's risk of obesity
Caesarean section does not increase a child's risk of obesity

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The new scientific work refutes the results of a number of small studies that have argued that a caesarean section increases the risk of obesity in a child. It turned out that earlier scientists did not take into account some important factors. Swedish scientists from the Karolinska Institute published their article in PLoS Medicine.

“Clinicians and mothers should not worry about the mode of delivery as a factor in the development of obesity in a child,” said co-author Viktor Ahlqvist.

The number of babies born by caesarean section is growing worldwide, from 6.7% in 1990 to 19.1% in 2014. This leap has prompted intensive research into the long-term effects of caesarean section on offspring health. Several studies have linked caesarean section to an increased risk of asthma, various allergies, and obesity. As possible explanations, it has been hypothesized that vaginal microorganisms have a positive effect on the newborn.

The authors of a new large study compared the body mass index (BMI) of 97291 men aged 18 years, and divided them into groups depending on the mode of birth - vaginal delivery, planned or unplanned caesarean section.

Scientists have found that at births due to an unplanned cesarean section, the risk of obesity is 17% higher compared with a vaginal birth. However, after taking into account many factors (maternal BMI before pregnancy, maternal smoking, maternal age, presence of diabetes, hypertension, maternal preeclampsia, and parental education), they concluded that mode of delivery does not play a significant role in determining the risk of obesity in a child.

“We found no evidence to support a link between caesarean sections and obesity. This suggests that a woman's way of giving birth may not be an important factor in the global obesity epidemic,”said Daniel Berglind, co-author of the study.

The most significant factor in overweight and obesity was the pre-pregnancy BMI of the mother. This is consistent with previous evidence of the heritability of obesity and the effects of maternal obesity on fetal health.

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