Again 25: How To Regain Youth When You Are Over 70, And Where Does The Muscles?

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Again 25: How To Regain Youth When You Are Over 70, And Where Does The Muscles?
Again 25: How To Regain Youth When You Are Over 70, And Where Does The Muscles?

Video: Again 25: How To Regain Youth When You Are Over 70, And Where Does The Muscles?

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Video: How to Maintain Muscle Mass as You Age 2023, February
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Again 25: how to regain youth when you are over 70, and where does the muscles?

It is believed that the loss of muscle mass with age is inevitable and muscles over time begin to respond poorly to stress. The New York Times in a review of a new study says this is not always the case. You can maintain good muscle condition using a safe and well-known method.

Again 25: how to regain youth when you are over 70, and where does the muscles?
Again 25: how to regain youth when you are over 70, and where does the muscles?

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It is believed that the loss of muscle mass with age is inevitable and muscles over time begin to respond poorly to stress. The New York Times, in a review of a new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology, says this is not always the case. You can maintain good muscle condition using a safe and well-known method.

Muscles usually react strongly to aging. Almost everyone loses some muscle mass by middle age. One of the main reasons for this is the intensification of inflammatory processes.

"Many studies, probably thousands, show that increased levels of inflammation factors in humans are associated with greater loss of muscle mass," said Todd Trappe, professor at Ball State University, co-author of the new study.

Dr. Trepp and his coauthors have long studied the physiology of physically active older people. They have previously shown that they have significantly lower levels of inflammation in their bodies than passive people. Now scientists have wondered how exactly this affects the muscles. Understanding this could shed light on healthy aging of muscles.

For the study, the scientists found a unique group of participants. They were men and women in their 70s who had been running regularly since the 1970s. In their work, the researchers compared the performance of active and passive healthy older people and athletic young people.

This study found that physically active older people have slightly less muscle mass than younger people. But the most interesting results came from studying the condition of the muscles in study participants.

All volunteers were asked to perform a series of heavy leg strength exercises. This test was supposed to give the muscles an excessive, unfamiliar tension. The researchers then examined the participants' blood counts and muscle biopsies.

After hard exercise, the inflammation in the muscles helps them recover. At the same time, if the inflammation is prolonged, it can harm, delaying muscle growth and strengthening.

The inflammatory response to exercise varied among study participants. It was the smallest among young people. Their muscles after exercise had more inflammatory cells and other markers of inflammation. But the anti-inflammatory activity in the tissues was also high: this showed that the inflammation should soon subside.

Physiological responses in older athletes were similar. In their muscles, the inflammation was slightly more pronounced, and the anti-inflammatory reactions were somewhat weaker. But all the indicators indicated that the muscles take the load well and will respond to it with strengthening.

In untrained older people, the signs of inflammation were extremely expressive, and there was nothing to indicate that it would pass quickly.

The study authors concluded that regular exercise can help healthy aging of muscles, and one of its mechanisms is to maintain their ability to fight inflammation. At the same time, for untrained people, inflammation in the muscles prevents them from getting all the possible benefits of exercise.

Scientists emphasize that these results should not discourage the elderly from engaging in physical activity and sports, who have not done this before.

“Even if inflammation gets in the way at first, your muscles will react and grow,” says Trepp.

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