10 Foods That Cause Headaches

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10 Foods That Cause Headaches
10 Foods That Cause Headaches

Video: 10 Foods That Cause Headaches

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Video: 10 Foods You Never Knew Would Trigger Headaches 2023, February
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10 foods that cause headaches

Headache can be provoked by various, sometimes unexpected, reasons or triggers. Their identification is often very difficult. These include environmental factors, associated diseases, fatigue, stress. Food is also one of those triggers.

10 foods that cause headaches
10 foods that cause headaches

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Headache can be provoked by various, sometimes unexpected, reasons or triggers. Their identification is often very difficult. These include environmental factors, associated diseases, fatigue, stress. Food is also one of those triggers.

According to the Migraine Research Foundation, food triggers combined with other causes of migraines are among the most significant.

“Up to 10% of the population is sensitive to food triggers that can trigger migraines. However, it is very difficult to identify the food that provokes it,”says Belinda Savage-Edvards, headache specialist.

Since every person is different, it is impossible to give absolute and clear recommendations on what food to avoid. What works negatively on one person will not necessarily act in the same way on another. However, there are some foods and ingredients that are relatively common in headaches and migraines.

1. Drinks containing caffeine - tea, coffee, cola. Scientists conducted studies in which people suffering from headaches gradually stopped consuming caffeinated foods. In one study, focusing on children and adolescents, 92% of the participants (33 people) had headaches after stopping caffeine. In another study, quitting it worked better than medication for many adults.

2. Aged cheeses - blue cheese, brie, cheddar, English stilton, feta, gorgonzola, mozzarella, muenster, parmesan, Swiss. The point is a substance called tyramine, which is formed during the breakdown of proteins in the processes of aging and decay. The longer the cheese is aged, the higher the tyramine content.

3. Alcohol is one of the main triggers of migraine headaches. Red wine, beer, whiskey and champagne are triggers for about 25% of people who suffer from regular migraines. Tyramine and tannins found in drinks play a role, as well as dehydration after drinking.

4. Chocolate is a trigger affecting approximately 22% of people who experience migraines. In addition to the already mentioned caffeine, it contains beta-phenylethylamine, which dilates the blood vessels in the brain.

5. Artificial sweeteners. They are found in many processed foods and are also used as a sugar alternative for people with diabetes. In particular, the most popular trigger is aspartame, according to the Mayo Clinic.

6. Products containing monosodium glutamate - frozen and canned food, snacks, salad dressings, sauces. The researchers note that glutamate can provoke migraine attacks in 10-15% of those who suffer from it. Instead of MSG, foods may contain potassium glutamate, autolyzed yeast, hydrolyzed protein, and sodium caseinate. All of these ingredients are also triggers.

7. Processed meat - deli meats, ham, sausages, sausages. In addition to the already mentioned monosodium glutamate, they contain nitric oxide, due to which the color and taste of the food is preserved. When nitric oxide enters the bloodstream, blood vessels in the brain dilate, triggering headaches or migraines.

8. Pickled and fermented foods - olives, sauerkraut, kombucha. They also contain high amounts of tyramine.

9. Frozen foods - ice cream, smoothies, ice-cold milk. Eating or drinking them quickly after physical activity or overheating can provoke severe stabbing headaches.

10. Salty food, increasing blood pressure, causes headaches and migraines. Salty processed foods that additionally contain the preservatives mentioned above are especially dangerous.

At the same time, there are also paradoxical studies that higher amounts of salt in the diet are associated with fewer attacks of severe headaches and migraines.

Nutritionists do not recommend giving up these foods right away. It is necessary to remove one of them for about 2 months, and then reintroduce it into your diet. If a headache occurs within the next 24 hours, and there are no other aggravating factors (menstruation, lack of sleep, hunger or thirst), the culprit may have been found.

In addition, you can help reduce the risk of headaches or migraines after eating:

a balanced, healthy diet rich in vegetables, fresh and whole grains and protein;

  • avoiding processed foods;
  • adherence to the diet;
  • rejection of products, the composition of which is not indicated on the label.

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