You Need To Blow Your Nose Correctly. Protect Yourself And Others

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You Need To Blow Your Nose Correctly. Protect Yourself And Others
You Need To Blow Your Nose Correctly. Protect Yourself And Others

Video: You Need To Blow Your Nose Correctly. Protect Yourself And Others

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Video: You've Been Blowing Your Nose All Wrong 2023, February
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You need to blow your nose correctly. Protect yourself and others

The need to blow your nose periodically arises for everyone: with colds, sinusitis, allergic rhinitis. But even in the 21st century, not everyone is doing it right, threatening their own health and putting others at risk.

You need to blow your nose correctly. Protect yourself and others
You need to blow your nose correctly. Protect yourself and others

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The need to blow your nose periodically arises for everyone: with colds, sinusitis, allergic rhinitis. But even in the 21st century, not everyone is doing it right, threatening their own health and putting others at risk.

With colds and allergies, the nasal mucosa swells and produces extra mucus to flush out infections, irritants, or allergens. But mucus is a comfortable environment for the growth of bacteria, congestion in the nasal passages and sinuses worsens the course of disease. In addition to maintaining inflammation in the nose and paranasal sinuses, thick mucus has another undesirable effect. It flows from the nasopharynx into the throat, irritating it and provoking a prolonged cough after a viral infection or allergic rhinitis.

Excess nasal mucus must be disposed of, blowing out is a medical necessity. But doing it wrong can hurt yourself.

Is it dangerous to blow your nose?

Blowing your nose too much and too often rarely leads to serious consequences. However, the medical literature also describes such complications of overly zealous blowing out as a fracture of the base of the orbit, "breakthrough" of air into the tissue between the lungs, severe headache from air entering the cranial cavity, and even rupture of the esophagus. All this is a consequence of high pressure in the nose and respiratory tract.

Strong blowing of your nose puts significant pressure on the Eustachian tube, which connects the middle ear to the back of the nose. This can lead to ear congestion, barotrauma or, in extreme cases, rupture of the eardrum. Also, when blowing the nose, nosebleeds may begin. These complications are more common.

In chronic sinusitis, researchers have shown that blowing your nose increases nasal pressure more than it does in healthy people. With both nostrils blocked, the pressure was much higher than with one nostril open.

In another study, researchers found that the pressure in the nose when blowing your nose is about 10 times higher than when you sneeze and cough. More alarming was their second discovery - after vigorous blowing out, a viscous liquid from the nose entered the paranasal sinuses. The researchers suggested that this could lead to infection of the sinuses with bacteria.

How is it correct?

  1. Blowing your nose should be gentle, clearing one nostril at a time. This prevents too high pressure build-up in the nose, which is the cause of major complications.
  2. Be aware of the possibility of spreading airborne infections. It is better to blow your nose away from other people. Ideally, this should be done in a tissue, which should then be thrown away. After the procedure, you need to wash your hands or treat them with an antiseptic.
  3. Use simple medicines.Using them can make blowing your nose less frequent, reduce the chance of unwanted effects, and improve nasal cleansing. Over-the-counter decongestants (vasoconstrictors) and antihistamines, available as tablets or sprays, can help reduce nasal congestion and mucus. However, we must not forget that long-term use of vasoconstrictor drugs increases the risk of developing medication rhinitis (nasal congestion when stopping their use), and antihistamines treat nasal congestion only of an allergic nature. To reduce the need for drugs for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis (inflammation of the lining of the nose and sinuses), rinsing the nose with saline solution and saline sprays, which dilute thick and sticky mucus, help clean it out, helping the natural mechanisms of its excretion.

When to see a doctor?

The Mayo Clinic recommends seeing a doctor for a cold in the following cases.

For adults:

symptoms last more than 10 days

  • heat,
  • a yellow or green nasal discharge, sinus pain or fever (signs of a bacterial infection)
  • nosebleeds or persistent clear discharge from a head injury.

For kids:

a child under 2 months old with a fever,

  • a runny nose or congestion of mucus causes feeding problems or makes breathing difficult.

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