Dislike For Vegetables Can Be Genetically Inherent

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Dislike For Vegetables Can Be Genetically Inherent
Dislike For Vegetables Can Be Genetically Inherent
Video: Dislike For Vegetables Can Be Genetically Inherent
Video: The Disadvantages of Genetic Vegetables 2023, February
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Dislike for vegetables can be genetically inherent

A certain gene makes vegetables that are good for the heart and blood vessels too bitter for many people. Therefore, heart-healthy vegetables such as Brussels sprouts and broccoli are often left out of the diet. Similar hypersensitivity can occur to foods such as dark chocolate, coffee and beer.

Dislike for vegetables can be genetically inherent
Dislike for vegetables can be genetically inherent

Photo: Rene Cortin / maxpixel.net /

Scientists from the University of Kentucky have suggested that a certain gene makes vegetables too bitter for many people, which are good for the heart and blood vessels. Therefore, heart-healthy vegetables such as Brussels sprouts and broccoli are often left out of the diet. Similar hypersensitivity can occur to foods such as dark chocolate, coffee and beer. The authors will talk about the new study at the American Heart Association conference.

Scientists have found that the problem may be related to the TAS2R38 gene: each of us has two copies of this gene. Carriers of two variants of this gene, called AVI, are not sensitive to the bitterness of vegetables. But people with one copy of AVI and another copy of PAV are very bitter.

For the study, the researchers analyzed the possibility that this relationship exists in people with two or more risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease. 175 people filled in questionnaires about their diet. The data on the TAS2R38 gene in the participants was taken from the results of another study that focused on the interaction of genes in the presence of risk factors for heart disease.

According to the study, people with the PAV gene are 2.5 times more likely to acutely sense the bitterness of vegetables.

The authors believe that this study should show doctors that it is necessary to change the approach to patients whom they recommend a certain diet to prevent heart disease.

Scientists want to develop a special diet that will be suitable for people who are acutely bitter. "This link can affect people's ability to change their diet, the ability to transition to a healthy diet," - said Jennifer L. Smith, co-author of the study.

Wayne University's Tonia Reinhard believes the study's authors have found an interesting genetic link between genes that influence diet and the potential for chronic disease.

“Because fruits and vegetables are high in nutrients that can reduce inflammation and oxidative stress - the leading causes of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases - anything that affects their intake has the potential to lead to disease,” she says.

Nutritionist Annie Mahon noted that bitterness can soften the cooking process. In addition, people with bitter sensitivities may choose other foods that contain all or nearly all of the nutrients they need.

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