Breastfeeding Is Associated With A Reduced Risk Of Diabetes And Hypertension

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Breastfeeding Is Associated With A Reduced Risk Of Diabetes And Hypertension
Breastfeeding Is Associated With A Reduced Risk Of Diabetes And Hypertension
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Breastfeeding is associated with a reduced risk of diabetes and hypertension

Women who breastfeed are less likely to develop diabetes and high blood pressure. American scientists came to such conclusions after analyzing information on 460,000 women. The authors attribute this to the fact that feeding helps burn calories and helps to normalize metabolism.

Breastfeeding is associated with a reduced risk of diabetes and hypertension
Breastfeeding is associated with a reduced risk of diabetes and hypertension

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Women who breastfeed are less likely to develop diabetes and high blood pressure. American scientists came to such conclusions after analyzing information on 460,000 women. They published their research in the JAMA Network Open.

Scientists analyzed data from previous studies on the connection of breastfeeding with diabetes and hypertension, they covered 206,000 and 255,000 women, respectively.

Women who breastfed for more than 12 months, on average, had a 30% lower risk of diabetes mellitus and 13% lower risk of hypertension compared with women who did not breastfeed for so long.

The authors suggest that this effect is due to the fact that feeding burns a large number of calories. This can potentially help alleviate or reverse problems that sometimes develop during pregnancy. We are talking about an increased level of "bad cholesterol" in the blood and a deterioration in sugar metabolism.

"There are various mechanisms that can be involved that alter certain negative metabolic changes during pregnancy," said study author Dr. Haitham Ahmed of the AdvantageCare Physicians network in New York.

Pediatricians currently recommend feeding only breast milk for up to 6 months. For at least a year, it is recommended to continue breastfeeding while expanding the baby's diet. This reduces the risk of respiratory infections, allergic diseases, obesity, diabetes and some other pathologies in children.

In a new study, researchers drew their conclusions about the effect of breastfeeding on the risk of developing hypertension and diabetes, taking into account family history, lifestyle and comorbidities.

The researchers noted that the studies they reviewed do not prove that breastfeeding can save diabetes or hypertension.

Yukiko Washio of the nonprofit research organization RTI International noted that women who have not breastfeed have an arsenal of other means to prevent diabetes and hypertension: physical activity, diet, alcohol and smoking cessation.

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