Flu Vaccination News. When And How To Get Vaccinated, What Does The Vaccine Affect?

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Flu Vaccination News. When And How To Get Vaccinated, What Does The Vaccine Affect?
Flu Vaccination News. When And How To Get Vaccinated, What Does The Vaccine Affect?

Video: Flu Vaccination News. When And How To Get Vaccinated, What Does The Vaccine Affect?

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Video: Flu vaccinations and COVID-19 2023, January
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Flu vaccination news. When and how to get vaccinated, what does the vaccine affect?

Is immunity against flu weakened at the peak of the cold season if vaccinations are too early? Does influenza vaccination reduce the effects of statins? Is it harmful to vaccinate so often?

Flu vaccination news. When and how to get vaccinated, what does the vaccine affect?
Flu vaccination news. When and how to get vaccinated, what does the vaccine affect?

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Three years ago, the STAT published some questions about influenza vaccination. Science has not stood still, and many studies have been published during this time, so STAT clarifies some new questions and returns to old problems based on new information.

1.How long does the flu vaccine's protection last, does it fade in one season?

Indeed, there is an “in-season relaxation” of protection. A study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, published in 2017, estimated a decrease of about 7% per month since vaccinations. A study by the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Center, published in Spring 2019, showed a higher attenuation rate of about 16% 28 days after vaccination.

Therefore, it is recommended to be vaccinated not in August-September, but closer to the end of October. But as the agency's director of influenza, Dan Jernigan, noted, "Anytime from September to November is better than not doing it at all."

2. Does taking statins reduce the effectiveness of the vaccine?

There are concerns that the use of statins (drugs to lower cholesterol) could actually undermine the effectiveness of the flu vaccine. This is especially troubling because statins are typically taken by older people who are at risk of becoming seriously ill or dying from the flu.

According to data received in recent years, concerns have not been confirmed. So, the research institute of the clinic. Marshfield looked at data from six seasons of influenza and found no significant reduction in vaccine efficacy among statin users.

And researchers from the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed the medical records of 2.8 million Medicare recipients and saw no difference between vaccinated statin users and those who did not take statins.

3. Is it worth getting vaccinated annually?

There is a growing belief that a yearly flu shot can interfere with the immune system's ability to generate a strong response to the vaccine. It is believed that this phenomenon occurs in years when the viruses in the vaccine were not updated, and the circulating viruses are different from the version of the vaccine. People who are re-vaccinated may eventually become infected. Influenza researchers call this "negative intervention."

A research team from McMaster University led by Marc Loeb conducted a massive meta-analysis, examining all the scientific literature on the subject. It was concluded that booster vaccinations do not always undermine the protection of a vaccine, but the question is "still a little open."

However, current guidelines for getting the flu shot each year are not subject to revision.

Also, with flu, an imprinting effect is observed, according to which the first influenza viruses that the body encountered in its life leave an indelible mark on the immune system. For example, if the first infection was caused by the H3N2 virus, the body will always produce more antibodies to H3 viruses when vaccinated.

Therefore, the belief that the flu seasons are most difficult for older people may shift to “some flu seasons”. In particular, older adults have done very well with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic - their immune system recognizes it as a distant cousin of the influenza virus they encountered earlier in life. While those born in the late 1950s and 1960s first became infected with other viruses, therefore, H1N1 viruses pose a greater threat to them.

4. Should I use FluMist?

It is the only nasal spray vaccine developed by AstraZeneca (AZN). In the USA, an expert committee found it ineffective and recommended not to use it in the 2016–2017 and 2017–2018 flu seasons. In 2018, the committee concluded that the changes made to the vaccine solved the problem of effectiveness and recommended it again, but by then many companies had already placed their orders for the 2018-2019 season. And this year another misfortune befell FluMist - AZN is having problems producing the viruses needed for two of the four components of the vaccine.

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