Alcohol And Life Expectancy In Russia Go Hand In Hand

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Alcohol And Life Expectancy In Russia Go Hand In Hand
Alcohol And Life Expectancy In Russia Go Hand In Hand
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Alcohol and life expectancy in Russia go hand in hand

New research shows that every decline in alcohol consumption in Russia over the past 40 years coincides with an increase in the life expectancy of Russians. Perhaps the current increase in life expectancy in the country also has a link to alcohol. The study is published in the latest issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol & Drugs.

Alcohol and life expectancy in Russia go hand in hand
Alcohol and life expectancy in Russia go hand in hand

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New research shows that every decline in alcohol consumption in Russia over the past 40 years coincides with an increase in the life expectancy of Russians. Perhaps the current increase in life expectancy in the country also has a link to alcohol. The study is published in the latest issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol & Drugs.

Much of the decline in alcohol use has been the result of economic factors and government alcohol policies. In modern Russia, the life expectancy of men and women, respectively, is 6.1 and 4.7 years more than in 1980. Scientists are convinced that alcohol consumption plays a huge role in this.

“Alcohol consumption has been recognized as one of the main factors, if not the most basic, influencing mortality in Russia,” according to the authors of the work, led by Maria Neufeld of the Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry, who also works at the Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy in Dresden technical university.

To examine the relationship between mortality, alcohol consumption, government policies, and social trends, the researchers analyzed a number of sources, including the Russian Fertility and Mortality Database. Scientists also obtained data from the Russian Statistical Service on life expectancy and beer sales.

The authors analyzed three periods during which alcohol consumption and mortality declined in Russia. The first was 1985-1987 - the period of Mikhail Gorbachev's anti-alcohol campaign. Shortly after the abolition of these measures in 1990, life expectancy fell again, and alcohol consumption, especially illegally produced vodka, increased.

During the second period from 1995 to 1998, life expectancy rose again. This was due to negative economic trends and a decrease in alcohol consumption. However, since 1998, the purchasing power of Russians has increased, followed by an increase in alcohol consumption and a decrease in life expectancy.

The third period, which began around 2003 and continues to the present, has led to the adoption of a number of government measures aimed at reducing alcohol consumption. These included stricter restrictions on sales hours and places in which alcohol can be sold, increases in minimum prices and taxes on alcohol, tougher licensing, and a ban on alcohol in public places. At the same time, the authors note that Russians' drinking habits have changed somewhat - they now more often prefer beer than vodka.

Although this study does not provide evidence that it was the reduction in alcohol consumption that directly led to an increase in life expectancy, the relationship between these phenomena is quite strong.

In an editorial to the study, experts also point out that government alcohol policy is not the only factor affecting alcohol consumption. Health policy and social and cultural norms play a role.

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