Scientists Have Found A Link Between The Risk Of Prostate Cancer And Artificial Insemination

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Scientists Have Found A Link Between The Risk Of Prostate Cancer And Artificial Insemination
Scientists Have Found A Link Between The Risk Of Prostate Cancer And Artificial Insemination

Video: Scientists Have Found A Link Between The Risk Of Prostate Cancer And Artificial Insemination

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Video: Application of Machine Learning to Prostate Cancer and Urology 2023, February
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Scientists have found a link between the risk of prostate cancer and artificial insemination

Men who become fathers by assisted reproduction appear to have a higher risk of prostate cancer compared to men who become naturally fathers. The data obtained by scientists indicate that these men should be screened for prostate cancer,

Scientists have found a link between the risk of prostate cancer and artificial insemination
Scientists have found a link between the risk of prostate cancer and artificial insemination

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Men who become fathers by assisted reproduction appear to have a higher risk of prostate cancer compared to men who become fathers naturally. This is evidenced by a new Swedish study published in the British Medical Journal. Scientists' findings suggest that these men should be screened for prostate cancer and then monitored because of the increased risk of developing this disease.

Since prostate cancer and many forms of infertility are associated with male sex hormones, the connection between them has been studied before, but some shortcomings of previous studies did not allow drawing clear conclusions. Therefore, a group of Swedish scientists decided to compare the risk and severity of prostate cancer in men who first became fathers using artificial insemination, and men who conceive a child naturally.

The scientists divided their fathers into three groups according to the method of conceiving children: 20618 (1.7%), conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF), 14882 (1.3%) - by injection of sperm into the egg (ICSI) and 1145990 (97%) - in a natural way. The average age of fathers at the birth of their children was 37 years for men using IVF and ICSI, and 32 years for men who conceived naturally. The researchers then examined the data on the registration of cases of cancer in the 20 years after birth.

Ultimately, the researchers found that men who became fathers from IVF and ICSI had a significantly higher risk of prostate cancer than men who had children naturally. Among men who conceived naturally, 3244 (0.28%) were diagnosed with prostate cancer, compared with 77 (0.37%) using IVF and 63 (0.42%) using ICSI.

That is, the risk of developing prostate cancer in men who resorted to assistive technology was, on average, 30-60% higher. The risk of developing early prostate cancer (diagnosed before age 55) was also particularly high in men who conceived children through ICSI, a technology used for men with the most severe forms of infertility. The increased risk persisted after excluding men with a previous diagnosis of cancer or undergoing testosterone replacement therapy.

Exactly how male infertility may be biologically linked to prostate cancer risk is not yet clear. Scientists do not believe that IVF and ICSI procedures contribute to the development of the disease. The authors suggest that abnormalities in the Y chromosome, associated with both infertility and prostate cancer, play a role. Scientists advise men at risk of being screened for prostate cancer, although they warn that unnecessary diagnostic procedures and over-treatment can be harmful.

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