A Small Amount Of Nuts In Your Diet Will Help You Not Gain Excess Weight

Table of contents:

A Small Amount Of Nuts In Your Diet Will Help You Not Gain Excess Weight
A Small Amount Of Nuts In Your Diet Will Help You Not Gain Excess Weight

Video: A Small Amount Of Nuts In Your Diet Will Help You Not Gain Excess Weight

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Can Nuts Help You Lose Weight? | The New York Times 2023, February
Anonim

A small amount of nuts in your diet will help you not gain excess weight

An increase in consumption of nuts by just 14 grams per day is associated with slower weight gain and lower risk of obesity, according to a new American study. Replacing unhealthy foods like processed meats and chips with small amounts of nuts prevents the gradual weight gain that often accompanies aging.

A small amount of nuts in your diet will help you not gain excess weight
A small amount of nuts in your diet will help you not gain excess weight

Photo: maxpixel.net /

An increase in consumption of nuts by just 14 grams per day is associated with slower weight gain and a lower risk of obesity, according to a new American study. Its results are published in BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health. The authors believe that replacing unhealthy foods such as processed meats, french fries and chips with small amounts of nuts may inhibit the gradual weight gain that often accompanies aging.

On average, according to American data, adults gain almost half a kilogram of weight each year, and a weight gain of 2.5-10 kg is associated with a significant increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Nuts are rich in healthy unsaturated fats, vitamins, minerals, and fiber, but they are high in calories, so they are often not considered useful for weight control. However, new research suggests that the quality of what you eat may be just as important as the quantity.

The researchers analyzed information on weight, diet, and physical activity in three groups of people: 51,529 men aged 40 to 75 working in the health care system; 121,700 nurses aged 35 to 55; 116,686 nurses aged 24 to 44.

The participants have been supervised for over 20 years. During this period, they reported their weight every 4 years and reported how often during the previous year they ate 28 grams of nuts, including peanuts and peanut butter. Every two years, their physical activity (walking, jogging, cycling, swimming and gardening) was assessed, after which the scientists calculated the amount of energy (calories) spent per hour of such physical activity. The average annual weight gain in all three groups was 0.32 kg.

Between 1986 and 2010, study participants from all three groups ate more nuts on average. An increase in consumption of any type of nut was associated with relatively less long-term weight gain and a lower risk of obesity. An increase in nut consumption of 14 grams per day was associated with a lower risk of gaining two or more pounds over four years. And a 14 g daily increase in walnut consumption was associated with a 15% reduction in the risk of obesity.

Replacing processed meats, refined breakfasts or desserts, including chocolate, baked goods, pies and donuts, with 14 grams of nuts was associated with preventing weight gain of 0.41–0.70 kg over four years. However, no such associations were observed with increasing consumption of peanut butter. The findings were confirmed after adjusting for changes in diet and lifestyle (exercise and alcohol consumption).

The weakness of the study was that, due to design considerations, it could not answer whether the relationship between eating nuts and weight was causal. In addition, the data were obtained through surveys. However, these results replicate those of previous observational studies, which increases the validity of the study.

The authors suggest that chewing nuts requires some effort, leaving less energy for other foods to eat, while the high fiber content of nuts may delay gastric emptying, making you feel fuller longer. Fiber in nuts also binds well to fat in the intestines, which means more calories are excreted from the body. There is also some evidence that high levels of unsaturated fat in nuts increase resting energy expenditure, which may also prevent weight gain.

According to the authors, snacking on a handful of nuts more often than cookies or chips may help prevent the weight gain that often accompanies aging.

Popular by topic