"Do You Vape?" Pulmonologists Have A New Question For Patients

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"Do You Vape?" Pulmonologists Have A New Question For Patients
"Do You Vape?" Pulmonologists Have A New Question For Patients
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Video: Vaping: The Epidemics in our Mist – Cottage Health 2023, February
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"Do you vape?" Pulmonologists have a new question for patients

Due to the surge in the prevalence of the disease associated with vaping in the United States, doctors began to have a new question in the routine questioning of a patient. Doctors, pulmonologists in particular, are increasingly asking patients whether they vape, that is, whether they use electronic cigarettes. This was reported by StatNews, whose reporters talked to doctors.

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In connection with the surge in the prevalence of the disease associated with vaping in the United States, doctors began to have a new question in the routine questioning of a patient. Doctors, pulmonologists in particular, are increasingly asking patients whether they vape, that is, whether they use electronic cigarettes. This was reported by StatNews, whose reporters talked to doctors.

Vaping-related disease has affected at least 530 people in the United States in recent months, with nine deaths reported. An investigation into its causes is currently underway in the country. The main symptoms of this pathology are cough, shortness of breath, heaviness in the chest, noisy breathing, as well as weakness and fever. The disease is still poorly understood.

Doctors have questioned patients for decades about smoking, alcohol and drug use. However, until very recently, questions about vaping were not part of the standard survey, despite its rapid rise in popularity. The use of electronic cigarettes was not only not considered a cause of serious illness, but was also seen as helping those who want to quit smoking. Now many doctors have begun to ask questions about vaping even to patients who have no specific symptoms.

Pnina Weiss, a children's pulmonologist at Yale School of Medicine, told StatNews that this is one of the most important changes in recent weeks. “Do you vape? Be honest. This is what I need to know,”she asks young patients.

Another change: pulmonologists are increasingly asked about the dangers of vaping and how to quit vaping. They also receive many similar questions over the phone, including from parents and pediatricians.

The study found that one in nine high school students use nicotine vaping liquids every day. However, adolescents are often not inclined to be frank about what they use. In particular, doctors and parents do not know much about the use of THC (the active ingredient in marijuana) in vaping. The presence of parents at the doctor's appointment reduces the likelihood that the teenager will talk about it.

“I try to improve communication and ask family members to leave the room so I can ask additional questions,” said Dr. Sean Callahan of the University of Utah Medical Network, who has treated several people with vaping-related conditions.

Dr. Weiss notes that it is important to standardize the questions that doctors ask patients about vaping at their appointments. Doctors need to know not only if the patient is vaping, but also what devices and substances they are using. The more system there is in the survey, the less likely it is that a fact will be forgotten.

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