Hormonal Contraceptives Linked To Diabetes Risk

Table of contents:

Hormonal Contraceptives Linked To Diabetes Risk
Hormonal Contraceptives Linked To Diabetes Risk

Video: Hormonal Contraceptives Linked To Diabetes Risk

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Hormonal Contraception Safer in Women With Diabetes 2023, January
Anonim

Hormonal contraceptives linked to diabetes risk

New research shows that pill use and longer menstrual cycles are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, while later puberty and late menopause are associated with lower.

Hormonal contraceptives linked to diabetes risk
Hormonal contraceptives linked to diabetes risk

Photo: maxpixel.net /

New research, presented this year at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Barcelona, ​​shows that birth control pill use and longer menstrual cycles are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, while later puberty and late menopause is associated with a lower risk.

A study led by Dr. Sopio Tatulashvili of the Avicenna Hospital in Bobigny, France, shows that prolonged presence of sex hormones in old age can reduce the risk of diabetes. In addition, scientists believe that women at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes who are taking birth control pills should consult a doctor.

The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between various hormonal factors and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The study included 83,799 French women. The researchers also took into account factors such as body mass index, smoking, age, physical activity, socioeconomic status, educational level, family history of type 2 diabetes, and blood pressure.

The authors noted that late puberty (over age 14 versus age under 12) lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes by 12%, and older age at menopause (52 and over versus age 47)) reduces the risk by 30%. Breastfeeding a baby was also associated with a 10% reduction in the risk of developing diabetes compared to those who never breastfed. In addition, an increase in the total number of menstrual cycles over a lifetime (over 470 in a woman's lifetime compared to 390) was associated with a 25% decrease in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Longer duration of exposure to sex hormones (38 years between puberty and menopause versus 31 years) was associated with a 34% reduction in diabetes risk.

Birth control pill use (at least once in a lifetime) was associated with a 33% increased risk of diabetes. Longer periods between periods (32 days or more versus 24 days or less) were associated with a 23% increased risk of diabetes. Longer exposure to sex hormones in old age may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, regardless of other risk factors, the authors say.

Popular by topic