Shorter People Are More Likely To Get Type 2 Diabetes

Table of contents:

Shorter People Are More Likely To Get Type 2 Diabetes
Shorter People Are More Likely To Get Type 2 Diabetes
Video: Shorter People Are More Likely To Get Type 2 Diabetes
Video: Can thin people get Type 2 Diabetes? 2023, February
Anonim

Shorter people are more likely to get type 2 diabetes

German scientists have found that height is associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes - people with short stature are more likely to get sick

Shorter people are more likely to get type 2 diabetes
Shorter people are more likely to get type 2 diabetes

Photo: pexels.com /

Short stature is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study by the German Institute for Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rebruecke published in Diabetologia.

The researchers analyzed data from more than 2,500 middle-aged German men and women in the European Prospective Cancer and Nutrition Study, which included 27,548 participants. After adjusting for age, lifestyle, education, and waist circumference, the researchers found a link between increased height and a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. With a height difference of 10 cm, the risk of type 2 diabetes in men is reduced by 41%, and in women - by 33%.

The relationship between height and diabetes risk was stronger among people of normal weight: with a difference of 10 cm, the risk reduction was 86% for men and 67% for women. Whereas with overweight / obesity - 36% and 30%, respectively.

"This may indicate that a higher risk of diabetes with a larger waist circumference counteracts the beneficial effects of growth, whether the larger waist circumference is due to growth or consuming too many calories," noted study authors Matthias Schulze (Matthias Schulze) and Clemens Wittenbecher.

The researchers took into account parameters such as sitting height and leg length. There has been a link between longer legs and a lower risk of diabetes.

In addition, the authors calculated the extent to which the relationship between growth and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes is explained by liver adipose tissue (measured as an index of fatty liver) and other factors of cardiometabolic risk. When the results were adjusted for liver fat, the risk of diabetes was reduced by 34% in men and only 13% in women.

Therefore, a large proportion of the risk reduction attributable to increased height is associated with lower liver fat and a healthier cardiometabolic profile in taller study participants. Since fatty liver contributes significantly to the higher risk in shorter people, reducing liver fat may help reduce the risk of diabetes, the researchers noted.

However, height is not the only criterion that should be considered when examining for any disease. People who are short should not automatically think they will get type 2 diabetes, while tall people should not consider themselves healthy, especially if they have other risk factors.

Popular by topic