Antibiotics May Increase Your Risk Of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Table of contents:

Antibiotics May Increase Your Risk Of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Antibiotics May Increase Your Risk Of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Video: Antibiotics May Increase Your Risk Of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Infections Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis 2023, February
Anonim

Antibiotics May Increase Your Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

A new British study found that 26 out of 100,000 people who took antibiotics develop rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, the more antibiotics patients took and the less time has passed since treatment, the more likely they were to develop arthritis.

Antibiotics May Increase Your Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Antibiotics May Increase Your Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Photo: pixabay.com /

A new British study found that antibiotic use is associated with an increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis. The results of the study were published in the journal BMC Medicine.

Scientists from Keele University and the Quadram Institute analyzed data from emergency medical records and found that patients taking antibiotics were 60% more likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, the more antibiotics the patients took and the less time passed since the treatment, the more likely it was.

The study authors suggest that 26 out of 100,000 people who took antibiotics develop rheumatoid arthritis. It is likely that the disease is caused by a range of factors, from genetics to the environment. In addition, it is impossible to say for sure whether antibiotics or the infection itself increase the risk for which they are prescribed. Therefore, research cannot be considered a reason to stop taking antibiotics if they are needed. Nevertheless, it is important for understanding the causes of the disease and finding ways to neutralize risk factors.

Scientists have found that the type of infection treated with antibiotics also plays a role in the development of arthritis. Upper respiratory tract infections that have been fought with antibiotics have been more associated with rheumatoid arthritis than others. Moreover, the relationship was not observed if the patient was not undergoing treatment.

An analysis of antibiotic types has shown that all are associated with an increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis. This suggests that the risk may be associated with antibiotic use in general.

A similar relationship has been seen in other recent studies linking antibiotic use to an increased risk of autoimmune conditions, including type 1 diabetes and autoimmune liver disease, and colon cancer.

In addition to targeting bacteria that cause infections, antibiotics also affect the human microbiome. This complex ecosystem of microbes helps maintain our health and plays an important role in modulating the immune system. Some small studies have previously shown that the microbiome in people with rheumatoid arthritis is less diverse. But this study is the first to examine the effects of antibiotics.

Popular by topic