People Over 55 Shouldn't Have To Wait For Retirement To Make Time For Health

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People Over 55 Shouldn't Have To Wait For Retirement To Make Time For Health
People Over 55 Shouldn't Have To Wait For Retirement To Make Time For Health

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People over 55 shouldn't have to wait for retirement to make time for health

According to a new report from the University of East Anglia, lack of time due to work and lack of motivation to be physically active is causing many people to deteriorate in retirement. However, older people need to maintain a level of physical activity if they want to feel good in retirement.

People over 55 shouldn't have to wait for retirement to make time for health
People over 55 shouldn't have to wait for retirement to make time for health

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According to a new report from the University of East Anglia, adults must maintain their level of physical activity if they want to be healthy and feel good after retirement. The report was published on the Active Norfolk resource.

Research shows that people around the age of 55 need to try to keep fit as much as possible because of the undeniable physical, mental and social benefits of being active. However, health problems, lack of time or energy due to work and lack of motivation lead to the fact that by the time of retirement, the condition of many leaves much to be desired.

Researchers examined the relationship between the end of the work service and physical activity. More than 1000 people over 55 took part in the online survey "Physical activity and retirement". The questions related to the level of physical activity of the respondents, their expectations and experience after completing their work experience. The research team also conducted focus groups and interviews with people of retirement age on how to stay physically active.

Lead researcher Charlotte Salter of the University of East Anglia's Norwegian School of Medicine commented: “In the UK, physical activity declines by about 55 years of age. Previously, weakness, soreness, deterioration in health and inactivity were considered companions of aging and were observed mainly in people over retirement age. But now they are found in a third of Britons 50–65 years old, that is, in people of pre-retirement age. In order to feel healthy in retirement, it is very important to maintain your physical condition until you are fifty or older.”

The researchers found that the main barriers to exercise are not only the reasons listed above (poor health and lack of time or motivation), but also the cost and availability of exercise. In addition, many respondents noted that they feel redundant in sports clubs, since the marketing strategy of the establishments is designed for young clients.

As the authors of the report note, there is no one-size-fits-all solution to the problem of keeping fit. But most mature people have been found to be positively influenced by activities that combine socializing and physical activity: dog walking, gardening, housework, childcare, or volunteering.

The research findings could be useful for creating programs to promote healthy aging, including in businesses, healthcare facilities and fitness centers. According to research project leader Rachel Cooke of Active Norfolk, employers can provide mature workers with the opportunity to be more active at work and during breaks by intelligently organizing work cycles, gathering walking groups and the like.

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