Diet And Exercise Can Help Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes From Exposure To Chemicals

Table of contents:

Diet And Exercise Can Help Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes From Exposure To Chemicals
Diet And Exercise Can Help Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes From Exposure To Chemicals

Video: Diet And Exercise Can Help Reduce The Risk Of Diabetes From Exposure To Chemicals

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: How diet and exercise can help prevent and treat diabetes 2023, February
Anonim

Diet and exercise can help reduce the risk of diabetes from exposure to chemicals

Certain chemicals in food packaging and sometimes in other products have been linked to an increased risk of diabetes. But much of this additional risk can be reduced by changes in diet and exercise. This is the conclusion reached by American scientists who published their results in the journal Diabetes Care.

Diet and exercise can help reduce the risk of diabetes from exposure to chemicals
Diet and exercise can help reduce the risk of diabetes from exposure to chemicals

Photo: pixabay /

Certain chemicals in food packaging and sometimes in other products have been linked to an increased risk of diabetes. But much of this additional risk can be reduced by changes in diet and exercise. This is the conclusion reached by American scientists who published their results in the journal Diabetes Care.

The researchers tested what chemicals were found in blood samples from 957 people without diabetes. They have been tested in particular for polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl compounds (PFAS), which are used in the manufacture of consumer products, to make them water-repellent, non-staining, or non-stick. The participants were then randomly assigned to two groups. One group underwent an intensive lifestyle change course that helped them lose 7% of their body weight. The other group took a placebo and maintained their dietary habits and levels of physical activity.

Two years later, the researchers again took a blood test for the same substances from the study participants. Tests have shown elevated levels of one of the substances in this group, known as PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid), in people taking placebo. This meant that they were at a higher risk of developing diabetes in later years. But the risk of diabetes did not increase in people who made drastic changes in their eating habits and started to exercise more.

“Our results show that some PFAS contribute to diabetes and diabetes complications,” says lead study author Andres Cardenas of the University of California, Berkeley. However, he said, dietary changes and increased exercise levels have weakened the link to diabetes, weakening adverse metabolic processes from these substances. Overall, 507 people developed diabetes during the follow-up period (mean 8.9 years).

More than 90% of the study participants were overweight or obese. Most of them were white, female, married / married, college-educated and non-smokers. Participants in the lifestyle change group were asked to do moderate to vigorous exercise for a minimum of 150 minutes per week. They also worked with mentors to advise them on how to change their diet and reduce their calorie intake. As a result, this group was 28% less likely to develop diabetes than participants who took a placebo. During the first two years of the study, PFOA concentrations in the lifestyle modification group increased less than in the placebo group: 0.31 nanograms per milliliter of blood versus 0.96 ng / ml.

The researchers also found that every 2-fold increase in the concentration of another substance in the same group (N-ethyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamide acetic acid) was associated with a 17% increased risk of developing complications of diabetes, such as blurred vision and loss of sensation in the limbs. The results were similar for both groups of participants. In addition, every doubling of the concentration of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOSC) was associated with an 18% increased risk of diabetes complications.

Scientists also note that results may be different in people who are not overweight or obese. However, they argue that proper nutrition and exercise can help prevent diabetes. It is very difficult to avoid exposure to these substances, they say, because they are found in so many foods and even in some water sources. However, you can avoid using nonstick cookware, which is one of the sources of these substances. The authors recommend using stainless steel, cast iron or ceramic cookware instead. Another avoidable source of these substances is aerosols used to waterproof footwear and clothing. Scientists say wax-based products can be used instead.

Popular by topic