Anemia Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia

Table of contents:

Anemia Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia
Anemia Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia
Video: Anemia Linked To Increased Risk Of Dementia
Video: Common drugs linked to increased risk of dementia 2023, February
Anonim

Anemia linked to increased risk of dementia

Both low hemoglobin levels and high hemoglobin levels are associated with an increased risk of developing and developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, researchers from the Erasmus University Medical Center of Rotterdam have found. The results are published in Neurology.

Anemia linked to increased risk of dementia
Anemia linked to increased risk of dementia

Photo: flickr.com /

Both low hemoglobin levels and high hemoglobin levels are associated with an increased risk of developing and developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, researchers from the Erasmus University Medical Center of Rotterdam have found. The results are published in Neurology.

The new study confirms earlier claims that anemia (a condition caused by a lack of hemoglobin, the oxygen-containing component of red blood cells) increases the risk of dementia. In addition, a link has been established between high hemoglobin levels and dementia.

Dutch scientists analyzed data from 12,305 people in the Rotterdam Population Study. The participants did not have dementia at the start of the study, the average age was 64.6 years, 57.7% of them were women.

The researchers measured serum hemoglobin levels and followed the participants for an average of 12 years. During this period, 1520 people developed dementia (1194 of them - Alzheimer's disease).

Scientists have divided into five groups based on the level of hemoglobin - from lowest to highest. Compared to participants in the middle, those at the highest (fifth) level had a 20% increased risk of developing any type of dementia and a 22% higher risk of developing Alzheimer's.

Those participants who were at the lowest level had an increased risk of dementia (29%) and an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (36%).

The researchers took into account a number of characteristics related to the health status and behavior of the participants. In particular, the level of education, blood pressure, presence / absence of diabetes, taking lipid-lowering drugs (lowering cholesterol and / or triglyceride levels in the blood), alcohol consumption.

“We don't have interventional studies [clinical trials] that show that changing hemoglobin can prevent dementia. And we cannot recommend interventions based on this study. Meanwhile, given the other beneficial effects of treating anemia, this study provides additional impetus,”said study lead author Frank J. Wolters.

Popular by topic