Banning Smoking In Public Places Significantly Reduces The Prevalence Of Heart Attacks

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Banning Smoking In Public Places Significantly Reduces The Prevalence Of Heart Attacks
Banning Smoking In Public Places Significantly Reduces The Prevalence Of Heart Attacks
Video: Banning Smoking In Public Places Significantly Reduces The Prevalence Of Heart Attacks
Video: World No Tobacco Day - WHO Event May 31st 2018 2023, February
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Banning smoking in public places significantly reduces the prevalence of heart attacks

The incidence of myocardial infarction among older adults in Scotland has declined in the decade since the nationwide indoor smoking ban came into effect, according to a new study by the Institute for Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Banning smoking in public places significantly reduces the prevalence of heart attacks
Banning smoking in public places significantly reduces the prevalence of heart attacks

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The incidence of myocardial infarction among older adults in Scotland has declined in the decade since a nationwide ban on indoor smoking went into effect, according to a new study by the Institute for Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

In Scotland, smoking was banned in all indoor public places and workplaces in 2006. During the first year after the ban came into force, the number of cases of myocardial infarction decreased by 17%, while in the same period in England, where the rules of smoking have not changed, - only 4%.

In people aged 60 and over, smoking bans were accompanied by a reduction in myocardial infarction rates of about 13% (14% in women, 13.2% in men) over the study period. However, the ban does not appear to have affected the incidence of myocardial infarction in young adults.

“People tend to start smoking in their youth, many years before they reach the age when myocardial infarction usually occurs. Therefore, any effect of counteracting a person's ability to smoke is likely to take some time before becoming apparent,”said study co-author Dr. Jill Pell.

Even before the smoking ban, the incidence of myocardial infarction was declining in Scotland, the researchers noted, but legislation encouraged further reductions. In their previous study on smoking bans, they found a decrease in the incidence of myocardial infarction among smokers and nonsmokers. In a separate study conducted just before the ban, they also found an increase in the number of smokers trying to quit smoking.

While these studies were not intended to prove a direct effect of prohibition on myocardial infarction prevention, "it is likely to help both encourage smokers to quit and protect nonsmokers and smokers from secondhand smoke from others," says Jill Pell.

“In general, for younger people, the effect was less significant over the 10-year period. This may be due to changes in other risk factors for heart disease, such as obesity and diabetes, over the same period of time,”said Stephanie Mayne, a researcher at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, which is not participated in the study.

Despite this, the results provide new evidence of the benefits of quitting secondhand smoke and living in places where it is not easy to start or continue smoking.

“Avoid exposure to secondhand smoke as much as possible. If you live with someone who smokes, try to establish a policy that restricts smoking outside the home and away from the car. And if you live in an apartment complex where you can smoke, advocate for policy change,”said Judith Prochaska, a Stanford University researcher who was not involved in the study.

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