Starting Stroke Treatment 15 Minutes Earlier Can Save Lives And Prevent Disability

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Starting Stroke Treatment 15 Minutes Earlier Can Save Lives And Prevent Disability
Starting Stroke Treatment 15 Minutes Earlier Can Save Lives And Prevent Disability

Video: Starting Stroke Treatment 15 Minutes Earlier Can Save Lives And Prevent Disability

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Video: Stroke: The Basics 2023, January
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Starting stroke treatment 15 minutes earlier can save lives and prevent disability

A new US study published in the JAMA Network found that treating a stroke 15 minutes earlier would significantly improve the outcome of the disease. A group of scientists tried to determine the relationship between the time of initiation of reperfusion therapy and treatment results in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

Starting stroke treatment 15 minutes earlier can save lives and prevent disability
Starting stroke treatment 15 minutes earlier can save lives and prevent disability

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A new US study published in the JAMA Network found that treating a stroke 15 minutes earlier would significantly improve the outcome of the disease. A group of scientists from the Medical School. David Geffen at the University of California, Los Angeles tried to determine the relationship between the time of initiation of reperfusion therapy and treatment outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. They found that starting treatment earlier and faster can save lives and prevent long-term disability.

A stroke develops when the blood supply to a specific part of the brain is suddenly blocked. In some cases, this occurs when the blood vessels in the brain rupture, when a cerebral hemorrhage occurs. Cardiovascular disease, including stroke, is the leading cause of death worldwide. Stroke is also a leading cause of severe and long-term disability.

Stroke treatment begins with the arrival of an ambulance to transport the patient to the hospital. In a clinical setting, the patient should receive emergency care, treatment to prevent recurrent stroke, and rehabilitation. Reperfusion therapy for acute ischemic stroke involves the intravenous infusion of drugs that dissolve blood clots in the vessels.

In a new study, the researchers wanted to determine the relationship between the rate of treatment with reperfusion therapy and its effectiveness in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Scientists analyzed data from 6756 people who had an ischemic stroke. The average age of the patients was 70 years and more than half of them were women. They also took into account the time it took to deliver and start treatment for the patient. As a result, they found that for every 1000 patients who were treated 15 minutes earlier, there were 15 fewer deaths and long-term disabilities. In addition, 17 out of every 1,000 of these patients were able to leave the hospital without assistance, and 22 were able to take care of themselves after discharge.

The researchers also found that the average time from arrival at the hospital to the start of treatment was 1 hour 27 minutes, and the average time from the onset of symptoms to treatment was about 3 hours 50 minutes. Additional data show that hospitals providing reperfusion therapy to more than 50 patients each year start treatment on average faster than those providing it to fewer than 30 patients a year. In addition, they found that treatment in stroke centers was faster.

Stroke patients outside hospital hours (for example, on holidays and weekends, and before 7 am and after 6 pm on weekdays) tend to receive treatment late. People who live alone or who cannot immediately recognize symptoms are also more likely to receive treatment late. The authors recommend expanding the number of doctors on duty outside office hours so that patients arriving at 2 am receive treatment as quickly as those arriving at 2 pm. They concluded that treating patients 15 minutes early could save thousands of lives.

With a stroke, every minute counts. It is very important to identify the signs and symptoms of stroke early. These include sudden weakness or one-sided numbness in an arm, face, or legs, sudden loss of vision (in one or both eyes), sudden difficulty speaking, problems understanding speech and sudden confusion, sudden severe headache with no known cause, sudden problems locomotion, such as loss of balance, coordination and dizziness.

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