The Effect Of Dietary Supplements And Diets On Heart And Vascular Health Was Limited

Table of contents:

The Effect Of Dietary Supplements And Diets On Heart And Vascular Health Was Limited
The Effect Of Dietary Supplements And Diets On Heart And Vascular Health Was Limited

Video: The Effect Of Dietary Supplements And Diets On Heart And Vascular Health Was Limited

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Supplements for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: Fact and Fiction | Boris Arbit, MD 2023, January
Anonim

The effect of dietary supplements and diets on heart and vascular health was limited

Taking dietary supplements (dietary supplements) and perhaps even following a diet does not protect against cardiovascular disease and premature death, a new general review of meta-analyzes and randomized controlled trials by American scientists has shown. His results are published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

The effect of dietary supplements and diets on heart and vascular health was limited
The effect of dietary supplements and diets on heart and vascular health was limited

Photo: maxpixel.net /

Taking dietary supplements (dietary supplements) and perhaps even following a diet does not protect against cardiovascular disease and premature death, a new general review of meta-analyzes and randomized controlled trials by American scientists has shown. His results are published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

To determine the effect of various dietary supplements and diets on mortality from all causes, cardiovascular mortality, heart attack, stroke and coronary heart disease, 277 studies were analyzed, which involved about 1 million adults. They also assessed the level and quality of the evidence base.

“The reason for this study was that millions of people in the United States and around the world are consuming dietary supplements or following certain dietary regimens. But there was no qualitative evidence that these interventions have any effect on cardiovascular protection,”said study lead author Safi Khan of West Virginia University.

According to the results, of the 16 dietary supplements reviewed, only two were beneficial - omega-3 fatty acids (usually found in fish oil, reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease) and folic acid (reduce the risk of stroke).

But almost everything else, including niacin, iron, and a variety of multivitamins, had no significant effect on mortality or cardiovascular disease. What's more, taking calcium and vitamin D together increases the likelihood of stroke, although separately they do not affect mortality and cardiovascular outcomes.

In terms of a variety of diets, the research team found a link between low-salt diets and a lower risk of premature death in general in people with normal blood pressure. With high blood pressure, the likelihood of death from cardiovascular disease decreased, but there was no significant effect on mortality in general.

The other seven diets reviewed (in particular, low fat, Mediterranean, increased fish oil intake) did not have any protective effect.

“Reducing salt intake has been associated with improved overall survival and cardiovascular mortality. This can be logical, as there is ample evidence from various studies to show that low salt intake generally normalizes high blood pressure, which directly affects cardiovascular outcomes,”Khan said.

The evidence supporting folate and omega-3 benefits, as well as harms from a combination of calcium and vitamin D supplements, was less compelling. For example, the inclusion of one study from China, where diets are typically not rich in natural folate, may have disproportionately influenced the results. In addition, most studies relied on food diaries, which are not always reliable.

“The randomized controlled trials lacked precision. They had problems in terms of methodology, in terms of the target population and in terms of when and where these studies were conducted. Thus, these conclusions should be taken with a grain of doubt,”summed up Khan.

In general, experts recommend keeping track of your salt intake and eating a variety of natural foods rather than supplements to get the nutrients you need.

"There is no magic nutrient that can help improve health and reduce the risk of premature death," said Bruce Y. Lee of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who was not involved in the study.

Popular by topic