Improper Sleep Patterns Are Fraught With Obesity, Hypertension And Diabetes

Table of contents:

Improper Sleep Patterns Are Fraught With Obesity, Hypertension And Diabetes
Improper Sleep Patterns Are Fraught With Obesity, Hypertension And Diabetes

Video: Improper Sleep Patterns Are Fraught With Obesity, Hypertension And Diabetes

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Sleep Disturbances Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: Interacting Epidemics 2023, February
Anonim

Improper sleep patterns are fraught with obesity, hypertension and diabetes

A large difference in sleep schedule from day to day increases the risk of simultaneously developing metabolic disorders, including high blood sugar, blood pressure, and excess fat. This is evidenced by data from a study published in Diabetes Care.

Improper sleep patterns are fraught with obesity, hypertension and diabetes
Improper sleep patterns are fraught with obesity, hypertension and diabetes

Large nightly fluctuations in sleep time or bedtime increase the likelihood of serious health problems such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and high cholesterol levels. This is the conclusion of a recent study conducted at Brigham Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston and published in Diabetes Care.

Sleep deprivation has long been linked to a wide range of metabolic disorders, but much of the research in this area has focused on the effect of average sleep.

“Large differences in sleep patterns from night to night (in both the length of rest and the timing of falling asleep) are associated with a higher risk of metabolic problems, in particular multiple and concurrent metabolic disorders. The negative effects of short sleep on some days of the week cannot be compensated for by an increase in sleep on other days,”said one of the study's authors, Tianyi Huang.

The study involved 2003 people aged 45 to 84 years. Scientists tracked their sleep at home over the course of a week using actigraphs (devices that measure sleep and wake times that are worn on the wrists). The authors then monitored the health of the participants for 6 years.

Study participants went to bed on average around 11:40 pm and slept for about 7 hours and 15 minutes each night. Fluctuations in sleep duration were more than one hour in about 66% of them, and in bedtime - in 45%.

A total of 707 participants (35%) had metabolic syndrome or multiple types of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess fat around the waist, and abnormal cholesterol levels or triglycerides.

With shifts in sleep mode from one to one and a half hours, the likelihood of metabolic syndrome increased by 27%, from one and a half to two hours - by 41%, and more than two hours - by 57% (compared with fluctuations of less than 1 hour). With regard to the length of night sleep, there was a 14% increase in risk if the sleep time varied from one hour to one and a half hours, and by 58% if the fluctuations exceeded one and a half hours.

Sleep research was conducted for a relatively short period. Therefore, it may not reflect the participants' sleep patterns for a longer time. In addition, the study was not a controlled experiment, so no causal relationship was established.

“The reason that increased variability in sleep patterns is detrimental to metabolic health may have to do with our biological clock. If we fall asleep at different times and sleep for different amounts of time, our internal clocks are likely to have a hard time synchronizing, which contributes to impaired body function,”suggested Kristen Knutson of Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, which was not involved. in the study.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US) recommends that most adults get at least 7 hours of sleep per night. To get enough sleep for the required amount of time without waking up at night, you should go to bed at the same time, sleep in a dark room without any electronic devices, and avoid heavy meals, caffeine and alcohol before bed.

Popular by topic