Research: HPV Vaccination Could Eradicate Cervical Cancer

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Research: HPV Vaccination Could Eradicate Cervical Cancer
Research: HPV Vaccination Could Eradicate Cervical Cancer

Video: Research: HPV Vaccination Could Eradicate Cervical Cancer

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Video: ‘Safe’ HPV vaccine could eradicate cervical cancer, says expert 2023, February
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Research: HPV vaccination could eradicate cervical cancer

An international study by British and Canadian scientists and published in The Lancet has provided compelling evidence that vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) effectively prevents cervical cancer and can promote its elimination.

Research: HPV vaccination could eradicate cervical cancer
Research: HPV vaccination could eradicate cervical cancer

Photo: torange.biz /

An international study by British and Canadian scientists and published in The Lancet has provided compelling evidence that vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) effectively prevents cervical cancer and can promote its elimination.

“We are seeing a decline in the key HPV infections that cause most cervical disease and a decline in cervical disease,” said research team member David Mesher, Chief Scientist, Public Health England.

HPV vaccines were first licensed in 2007, and since then, vaccinations have been carried out in at least 100 countries around the world. Two vaccines are currently available. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends vaccinating girls and boys aged 11-12.

Scientists collected and analyzed data over an 8-year period from 65 separate studies from 14 high-income countries (60 million people in total).

Among all countries studied after five to eight years of vaccination, infection with two types of HPV (HPV 16 and 18, which cause 70% of cervical cancer) decreased by 83% among girls aged 13-19 and by 66% among women aged 20-24 … The diagnosis of precancerous conditions decreased by 51% among the surveyed girls aged 15-19 and by 31% among the surveyed women aged 20-24.

The study also revealed a 67% decrease in the incidence of anogenital warts among girls 15-19 years old and by 31% among women 25-29 years old. There was also a 48% decrease in boys aged 15-19 and 32% in men aged 20-24.

“Our results strongly suggest that vaccination against HPV helps prevent cervical cancer in the real world by reducing both the number of HPV cases that cause most cervical cancers and the precancerous lesions of the cervix,” said Melanie Drole, senior research scientist. researcher at the University of Laval, one of the authors of the study.

According to data released in February by the International Agency for Research on Cancer WHO, 570,000 new cases of cervical cancer were diagnosed worldwide in 2018, making it the fourth most common cancer among women in the world. More than 310,000 women die of cervical cancer each year, the vast majority of them living in poorer countries with low or no HPV immunization coverage.

“Based on our findings, we believe that WHO's call for action to end cervical cancer is possible in many countries if there is sufficient vaccination coverage,” concluded study leader Mark Brisson, professor at Laval University of Canada.

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