Heart Attack And Angina Pectoris Indicate The Risk Of Impaired Thinking In The Near Future

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Heart Attack And Angina Pectoris Indicate The Risk Of Impaired Thinking In The Near Future
Heart Attack And Angina Pectoris Indicate The Risk Of Impaired Thinking In The Near Future

Video: Heart Attack And Angina Pectoris Indicate The Risk Of Impaired Thinking In The Near Future

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Heart attack and angina pectoris indicate the risk of impaired thinking in the near future

Patients who are diagnosed with coronary artery disease are at increased risk of cognitive decline, according to a new study. A study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that scores on cognitive tests including verbal memory and temporal orientation.

Heart attack and angina pectoris indicate the risk of impaired thinking in the near future
Heart attack and angina pectoris indicate the risk of impaired thinking in the near future

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Patients who are diagnosed with coronary artery disease are at increased risk of cognitive decline, according to a new study.

A study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that scores on cognitive tests, including verbal memory and timing, declined faster after diagnosis in coronary artery disease patients than before.

According to scientists, this shows once again how the heart and brain work together. The study authors say that previous work on this issue usually focused on the effects of stroke on cognitive decline. A new study has found a factor that has a long-term effect on the brain in adults who have not had a stroke.

The authors examined data from a total of 7,888 participants over the age of 50. For 12 years, scientists have been monitoring this group of patients. During this period, 5.6% of them were diagnosed with myocardial infarction or angina pectoris caused by ischemic disease. In these same patients, a relative faster decline in cognitive functions was observed, while in patients with a heart attack it occurred much faster than in patients with angina pectoris.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is thought to affect the brain in several ways, including it can affect small blood vessels, disrupting the flow of oxygen to parts of the brain. In addition, common risk factors such as obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure may play a role. New research suggests that there is a gradual process of CVD affecting the brain, but how this works is still unclear. The authors note that they do not rule out the potential effects of medication given to patients with diagnosed heart disease.

Despite the fact that, according to the authors, the changes in cognitive performance appear "relatively small", they believe that "even a slight decline in cognitive function can lead to a significant increase in the risk of developing dementia over the next years." To better prevent the decline of these functions, they said, it is necessary to identify them as early as possible.

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