Rheumatic Diseases Were Not A Hindrance To Vaccination

Table of contents:

Rheumatic Diseases Were Not A Hindrance To Vaccination
Rheumatic Diseases Were Not A Hindrance To Vaccination

Video: Rheumatic Diseases Were Not A Hindrance To Vaccination

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: COVID-19 Vaccine, Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases 2023, February
Anonim

Rheumatic diseases were not a hindrance to vaccination

Rheumatic diseases are not an obstacle to vaccination, according to research presented in Madrid at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, co-organized with the Society of Pediatric Rheumatology.

Rheumatic diseases were not a hindrance to vaccination
Rheumatic diseases were not a hindrance to vaccination

Photo: pixabay.com /

Rheumatic diseases do not interfere with vaccination, according to research presented in Madrid at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, co-organized with the Society of Pediatric Rheumatology.

More than 75,000 children in Europe suffer from rheumatic diseases. Given the increased risk of influenza infection among these children, safe and effective vaccination is critical. These patients receive high doses of drugs that suppress the immune system, so they are currently advised to avoid live attenuated vaccines. This is associated with a theoretical, but unproven, risk of infection.

In light of the recent increase in measles incidence, some doctors are vaccinating weakened live measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) and chickenpox vaccines in patients with rheumatic diseases receiving immunosuppressive therapy.

“Patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases are at increased risk of infection, so it is imperative to get vaccinated where possible to save lives. There is a lot of “fake news” about vaccinations in the media and on the Internet, and therefore we welcome the data presented today, which should help allay some public concerns,”said Professor Hans Bijlsma, President of the European League Against Rheumatism.

The study involved 234 children (13 health centers in 10 countries) who were vaccinated with an attenuated (live) booster vaccine during immunosuppressive therapy. They did not develop infections due to vaccinations and the level of side effects was extremely low.

“The current recommendations are cautious due to the low level of evidence, and therefore we are launching a prospective study on the safety and effectiveness of the MMR booster vaccine,” said Professor Yosef Uziel of Tel Aviv University.

The first study of influenza vaccine in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (AIRD) was also presented at the congress. This vaccine is not live attenuated and is recommended for all patients with rheumatoid arthritis, regardless of treatment. However, many patients are not vaccinated and therefore put themselves at risk.

The study included 14,928 cases of AIRD and found no association between influenza vaccination and disease activity, corticosteroid use, or vasculitis. Moreover, vaccinations are associated with a significant reduction in fatigue over the next 2–3 months and a significant reduction in primary care consultations for joint pain over the next 3 months.

“Our results clearly support the use of influenza vaccine in patients with rheumatic diseases and should allay any fears people have about reports of an association with disease activity or vasculitis,” said Dr. Georgina Nakafero of the University of Nottingham.

Another reason why people with rheumatic diseases who are taking immunosuppressive drugs are not vaccinated against influenza is that because of a weakened immune system, the response to the vaccine may not be sufficient to protect the patient from subsequent influenza infection. However, the third study presented showed that influenza vaccination prevents more cases of influenza in patients who are being treated for rheumatoid arthritis than in otherwise healthy people.

“Our analysis provides additional evidence for the effectiveness of influenza vaccination in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors and should be a call to action for all rheumatologists to consider vaccinating such patients,” said Dr. Giovanni Adami. Adami) from the University of Verona.

Popular by topic