Owls Can Rearrange Themselves And Make Themselves Comfortable In The World Of Larks

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Owls Can Rearrange Themselves And Make Themselves Comfortable In The World Of Larks
Owls Can Rearrange Themselves And Make Themselves Comfortable In The World Of Larks

Video: Owls Can Rearrange Themselves And Make Themselves Comfortable In The World Of Larks

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Owls can rearrange themselves and make themselves comfortable in the world of larks

Owls can rearrange themselves and make themselves comfortable in the world of larks
Owls can rearrange themselves and make themselves comfortable in the world of larks

Photo: pixabay.com /

The circadian rhythm of owls can be altered within three weeks through non-pharmacological and practical interventions, according to an international study from the Universities of Birmingham and Surrey in the UK and Monash University in Australia and published in Sleep Medicine.

“Our findings highlight the ability of simple, non-drug interventions to incrementally rebuild night owls, reduce negative mental health and sleepiness, and manage time for peak performance in the real world,” said lead researcher Dr. Elise Facer-Childs).

Disturbances in the sleep / wake system are associated with a variety of health problems, including mood swings, increased morbidity and mortality, and decreased cognitive and physical performance.

"Sleeping late leads to disagreements with the normal daily routine in society, which can lead to a number of adverse effects - from daytime sleepiness to poor mental health," explained study co-author Dr. Andrew Bagshaw. "Now we need to understand how habitual sleep patterns are related to the brain, how it relates to mental health, and whether interventions lead to lasting change."

The study involved twenty-two healthy people who, on average, went to bed at 2.30, and woke up at 10.15. For three weeks, participants in the experimental group were offered:

wake up 2-3 hours before your usual wake-up time and make the most of natural light in the morning;

  • go to bed 2-3 hours earlier than usual and limit light in the evening;
  • keep sleep / wake time both on workdays and on weekends;
  • eat breakfast as early as possible after waking up, eat lunch at the same time every day, and refrain from dinner after 7pm.

The results showed improvements in cognitive (reaction time) and physical (grip strength) performance in the morning (when owls tend to have very high levels of fatigue), and a shift in peak performance from evening to daytime. There was also an increase in the number of days the participants had breakfast, which contributed to improved mental well-being (reduced feelings of stress and depression).

“Providing a simple routine can help night owls adjust their body clocks and improve overall physical and mental health. Insufficient sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances can disrupt many processes in the body, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes,”said Professor Debra Skene, co-author of the study.

As the researchers noted, owls are more at risk than early risers in our society because they have to adjust to work / school schedules.

“By recognizing these differences and providing the tools to improve results, we can go a long way in a society that is under constant pressure to achieve optimal performance and performance,” summed up Alice Feiser-Childs.

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