WHO Sounds Alarm Over Sexually Transmitted Infections

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WHO Sounds Alarm Over Sexually Transmitted Infections
WHO Sounds Alarm Over Sexually Transmitted Infections

Video: WHO Sounds Alarm Over Sexually Transmitted Infections

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Video: Video Sexually transmitted infections (STI's) 2023, January
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WHO sounds alarm over sexually transmitted infections

The World Health Organization has called for a more open discussion of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). According to the WHO, published online, 376 million (more than 1 million per day) cases of infection with four diseases are registered annually: chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis and trichomoniasis.

WHO sounds alarm over sexually transmitted infections
WHO sounds alarm over sexually transmitted infections

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The World Health Organization has called for a more open discussion of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). According to the WHO, published online, 376 million (more than 1 million per day) cases of infection with four diseases are registered annually: chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis and trichomoniasis.

The WHO study looked at four treatable and treatable bacterial diseases rather than sexually transmitted viruses such as HIV and the human papillomavirus (HPV), which can cause cervical cancer.

“These infections are treatable and cured with antibiotics, but unfortunately most of these infections are asymptomatic and therefore people do not realize they have an infection, they don’t realize that they are in danger and they don’t get tested and treatment. The possibility of transmission of infection to their sexual partners, as well as from mothers to their unborn children, is very high,”said Dr. Melanie Taylor, lead author of the study.

In 2016, there were 127 million new cases of chlamydia, 87 million cases of gonorrhea, 6.3 million cases of syphilis and 156 million cases of trichomoniasis among men and women aged 15 to 49 years. Sometimes people have recurrent or multiple infections. Previous data analysis was conducted in 2012 and no improvement was found.

On average, one in 25 people worldwide has an STI. These infections can lead to stillbirth, death of newborns and infertility. Syphilis alone causes more than 200,000 stillbirths and newborn deaths each year.

“We are seeing a lack of progress in stopping the spread of sexually transmitted infections around the world. This is a wake-up call for a concerted effort to ensure that everyone, wherever they may be, has access to the services they need to prevent and treat these debilitating diseases,”said Dr. Peter Salama, Executive Director of Universal Coverage. health and life cycle services at WHO.

The WHO says there is too little focus on STIs, there is not enough data, and there is a risk of some infections spiraling out of control as bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. STIs are more common than commonly believed and do not receive enough attention, and infected people are stigmatized and neglected.

“We should speak openly and honestly about sexually transmitted diseases. STIs should not be treated differently than any other infection. Most importantly, we can't stick them under the rug and pretend they don't exist,”said Dr. Teodora Wi, WHO Medical Officer for STIs.

She called for the proliferation of cheap and affordable tests to diagnose STIs in men and women worldwide, and more data. Health care providers should “respect the right of everyone to make sexual choices that are consistent with their personal values” and “normalize the conversation about sex”.

The rise in antibiotic resistance, which makes it difficult to treat STIs, is of particular concern to specialists. They are concerned about the large number of cases of gonorrhea and, in particular, the so-called super-gonorrhea, which is practically not cured.

“The incurable cases of gonorrhea are the harbingers of a wider crisis, when widespread infections are increasingly difficult to treat. We urgently need to reduce the spread of these infections and invest in new antibiotics and treatments to replace those that no longer work,”said Dr. Tim Jinks, head of the Wellcome Drug Resistant Infections Program.

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