High Fat Mass Dramatically Increases The Risk Of Death After Heart Surgery

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High Fat Mass Dramatically Increases The Risk Of Death After Heart Surgery
High Fat Mass Dramatically Increases The Risk Of Death After Heart Surgery

Video: High Fat Mass Dramatically Increases The Risk Of Death After Heart Surgery

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High fat mass dramatically increases the risk of death after heart surgery

According to a new study by French physician Xavier Leroy of the Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care at the University of Lille Medical Center, along with colleagues, the mortality rate in patients with high fat mass undergoing heart bypass surgery is more than four times higher.

High fat mass dramatically increases the risk of death after heart surgery
High fat mass dramatically increases the risk of death after heart surgery

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According to a new study by French physician Xavier Leroy of the anesthesia and intensive care unit of the University of Lille Medical Center (CHU Lille) and colleagues, the mortality rate in patients with high fat mass who underwent heart bypass surgery more than quadrupled higher. The results of the work were presented at the Euroanae Congress held in Vienna.

Research has shown that several factors, including fat mass and lean body mass, can complicate heart surgery. Dry weight is a person's weight minus fat, which can be roughly calculated based on gender, measuring his height, weight, waist.

The authors conducted a retrospective study of 3373 patients who underwent elective heart surgery between January 2013 and December 2016. Within 30 days after surgery, 2.1% of patients died, and there were significant differences between patients with different body mass index, fat mass and lean body mass. However, body mass index (BMI) by itself has not been recognized as a factor influencing mortality.

“The 25% of the patients with the highest fat mass were 4.1 times more likely to die than the 25% with the lowest fat mass, and the 25% of the patients with the lowest lean mass were 2.8 times more likely to die than 25%. patients with the highest lean body mass,”the authors said.

BMI from 25 to 29.9 indicates overweight, BMI 30 or more is considered obese; severe obesity - BMI 44.9 or more.

Previously, scientists talked about such a controversial phenomenon as the "obesity paradox." Some studies have shown that a higher BMI may be associated with lower mortality and better outcomes in some chronic diseases.

In a new study, it is noted that BMI does not take into account fat mass, nutrition, the state of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems, the distribution of body fat and other factors affecting mortality. Low body weight can also be the result of a disease, rather than its cause.

Previous research also shows that the more overweight a person is, the more likely they are to die prematurely. According to a study by the Harvard School of Public Health. T. Chan (Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health) in 2017, weight gain in middle age increases health risks later in life. People who gained moderate weight (2.5 to 10 kg) before the age of 55 had an increased risk of premature death, chronic disease, and a decreased likelihood of healthy aging. The more weight a person gained, the greater the risk of developing chronic diseases.

"These findings indicate that even modest weight gain can have serious health consequences," lead study author Frank Hu said in a statement.

However, at this age, most people gain weight as metabolism slows down, knee and back injuries occur more often, and many people work longer and are physically active.

Overweight and obesity are associated with a higher risk of premature death and, according to a 2016 international study by the Harvard School of Public Health and the University of Cambridge.

Looking at specific causes of death, the study found that when BMI increased by five units (say, from 30 to 35), the risk of death from cardiovascular disease increased by 49%, from respiratory disease by 38%, and by 19% from cancer.

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