Fine Motor Skills Of Surgeons May Suffer From Childhood Lifestyle

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Fine Motor Skills Of Surgeons May Suffer From Childhood Lifestyle
Fine Motor Skills Of Surgeons May Suffer From Childhood Lifestyle

Video: Fine Motor Skills Of Surgeons May Suffer From Childhood Lifestyle

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Fine Motor Skills 2023, February
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Fine motor skills of surgeons may suffer from childhood lifestyle

Teachers at medical schools in the United States and Great Britain have noted a noticeable deterioration in fine motor skills in students and interns, according to The New York Times. On the one hand, this may be due to a decrease in the number of practical lessons in primary and secondary schools. On the other hand, children spend too much time in front of screens, which also does not develop motor skills.

Fine motor skills of surgeons may suffer from childhood lifestyle
Fine motor skills of surgeons may suffer from childhood lifestyle

Photo: pixabay.com /

Teachers at medical schools in the United States and Great Britain have noted a noticeable deterioration in fine motor skills in students and interns, according to The New York Times. On the one hand, this may be due to a decrease in the number of practical lessons in primary and secondary schools. On the other hand, children spend too much time in front of screens instead of activities that develop fine motor skills - woodworking, model assembly and handicraft.

“There is a touch language that is easy to overlook or ignore. It is much more difficult to master it when you are 24, 25 or 26 than when you are 4, 5 or 6,”said Dr. Roger Kneebone, professor of surgical education at Imperial College London.

Former President and CEO of the Barrow Neuroscience Institute in Phoenix, Robert Spetzler, agreed: “Think of the difference between learning to ski as a young child and someone who spent a lot of time, perhaps even as much. skiing, adults. This elegance that you learn as a child … can never be compared to how adults learn to ski."

A virtuoso brain surgeon, Robert Spetzler developed his finger dexterity as a child through playing the piano. In high school, he operated on gerbil mice, all of which survived.

“The sooner you start doing a physical, repetitive task, the better your motor skills will take root and become instinctive. A great surgeon is made by tireless practice,”he explained.

The scientific literature is replete with studies showing the correlation between the experience of surgeons and the condition of patients. The more often the surgeon operates, the higher the likelihood of patient survival, shorter hospital stays and fewer complications.

Advances in technology have created the ability to perform minimally invasive procedures. In some cases, it’s not so much finger dexterity that’s needed as the skills and reflexes that can be acquired through video games. But, nevertheless, they also require repetition and experience.

Even if there is no need for exceptionally developed fine motor skills, some experts fear the "curvature" of medical students, whose main experience of working with their hands is typing with the thumb.

As a child, Maria Siemionow, a transplant surgeon at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, knitted sweaters as a child, cut pictures and words from magazines and glued complex collages from them. This creative endeavor not only develops finger dexterity, but also requires 3D imagination, planning, patience, and precision.

“If you see that a small stitch is too tight or you have glued something wrong, you will have to repeat and learn to do better. It is these basic skills that you also need to be a surgeon,”she shared.

In 2008, under the leadership of Maria Semyonov, the first almost complete face transplant was performed. She is currently researching and teaching interns to perform complex surgical procedures under a microscope.

“What I see is a wake-up call: schools need to do more to encourage creativity and 3D thinking,” she says.

In addition, educators question whether the selection of medical students for surgical programs is well organized, as 30-50% of complications from surgical procedures can be potentially avoided. They are chosen on the basis of intellectual ability - assessments and test results, the number of articles written and research conducted, but for a good surgeon this does not matter in principle.

According to Michael Lawton, current president and CEO of the Barrow Neurological Institute, "What matters is how they handle instruments and how they touch tissues, and how they respond and adapt to stress in the operating room."

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