Fatherhood In Adulthood Is A Threat To Both The Unborn Child And His Mother

Table of contents:

Fatherhood In Adulthood Is A Threat To Both The Unborn Child And His Mother
Fatherhood In Adulthood Is A Threat To Both The Unborn Child And His Mother

Video: Fatherhood In Adulthood Is A Threat To Both The Unborn Child And His Mother

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Fathers Be Good to your Daughters: The Link Between Fatherlessness and a Sexualized Culture 2023, February
Anonim

Fatherhood in adulthood is a threat to both the unborn child and his mother

Men’s postponement of fatherhood can negatively affect the health of their partners and children, according to the results of a 40-year study on the effect of parental age on fertility, pregnancy and child health, published in the journal Maturitas.

Fatherhood in adulthood is a threat to both the unborn child and his mother
Fatherhood in adulthood is a threat to both the unborn child and his mother

Photo: maxpixel.net /

Men’s postponement of fatherhood can negatively affect the health of their partners and children, according to the results of a 40-year study on the effect of parental age on fertility, pregnancy and child health, published in the journal Maturitas.

"While it is generally accepted that physiological changes that occur in women after 35 years of age can affect conception, pregnancy and child health, most men do not realize that their old age can have a similar effect," - said study author Gloria Bachmann), director of the Robert Wood Johnson Rutgers School of Medicine's Women's Health Institute.

In medicine, there is no clearly accepted definition of the onset of an elderly paternal age - it ranges from 35 to 45 years.

The study found that men aged 45 and older may experience declining fertility and put their partners at risk of developing complications of pregnancy such as gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and premature birth. Men faced fertility problems even if their partner was less than 25 years old.

Babies born to older fathers were found to have a higher risk of prematurity, stillbirth, low Apgar scores, low birth weight, neonatal seizures, and birth defects (congenital heart defects and cleft palate). As they got older, these children were more likely to develop cancer, autism, mental and cognitive disorders.

Researchers attribute most of the findings to a natural age-related decline in testosterone levels, as well as sperm degradation and deterioration in sperm quality, but some correlations require more research.

“In addition to reducing the potential for fertilization, it can also affect the pregnancy itself, which is marked by an increased risk of pregnancy when conception is successful,” said Gloria Bachmann.

Disorders on the part of sperm from the stress of aging leads to a decrease in the number and change of sperm, which are passed from parent to offspring and are included in the DNA of cells in the offspring's body. These mutations can cause disorders in offspring, such as autism and schizophrenia.

“While it is scientifically proven that children of older fathers are more likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia - 1 in 141 children with fathers under 25 versus 1 in 47 with fathers over 50 - the reason is not entirely clear. In addition, some studies have shown that the risk of autism begins to increase when the father is 30, plateau after 40, and then rises again at 50,”said Gloria Bachmann.

Women tend to be better informed about reproductive health, while most men do not consult a doctor unless they have infertility or serious health problems. To reduce the risk to maternal and child health, the researchers recommend that men planning to delay paternity consider sperm cryopreservation before age 35 (or at least 45).

Popular by topic