Weight Before Pregnancy May Indicate The Possibility Of Complications

Table of contents:

Weight Before Pregnancy May Indicate The Possibility Of Complications
Weight Before Pregnancy May Indicate The Possibility Of Complications
Video: Weight Before Pregnancy May Indicate The Possibility Of Complications
Video: Obesity and Pregnancy 2023, February
Anonim

Weight before pregnancy may indicate the possibility of complications

Weight gain during pregnancy is a major concern for mums-to-be and doctors, but pre-pregnancy weight may be much more important, new research in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows.

Weight before pregnancy may indicate the possibility of complications
Weight before pregnancy may indicate the possibility of complications

Photo: pixabay.com /

Weight gain during pregnancy is a major concern for mums-to-be and doctors, but pre-pregnancy weight may be much more important, new research in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows.

Obesity among women of reproductive age is a serious problem. According to the data obtained, the more a woman weighed at the beginning of pregnancy, the higher the likelihood of complications such as high blood pressure, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, caesarean section and premature birth.

“Instead of focusing on increasing maternal weight during pregnancy, strategies are needed to optimize maternal weight before pregnancy to improve pregnancy outcomes,” said senior study author Dr. Romy Gaillard, associate professor of pediatrics at Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam. in the Netherlands.

However, this does not mean at all that expectant mothers can safely “eat for two” throughout their pregnancy.

Scientists reviewed 25 studies involving 196,670 women from Europe and North America. Data were collected between 1989 and 2015, with the average age of women being 30.

Researchers classified women by weight status using their body mass index (BMI). About 4% of women were underweight (BMI up to 18.5), 68% were normal (18.5-24.9), 20% were overweight (25-29.9), about 8% were obese (30 or more). 6% of women suffered from obesity of the 1st degree (30-34.9); 2nd degree (35.0-39.9) - almost 2%, 3rd degree (40 and above) - 0.5%.

According to the study, just over 37% of pregnancies had adverse events. Approximately 35% of underweight women faced adverse events, while with obesity of the 3rd degree - 61% of women.

“Pregnancy is not a sprint, it is a marathon. What really matters is how are you going to get pregnant? And it's not just weight, we need to optimize other metabolic and nutritional factors prior to conception,”said Dr. Jill Rabin, co-director of outpatient care at Nordwell Health Hospital in New Hyde Park, who reviewed the study.

Regarding the weight gained during pregnancy, Jill Rabin explained: “There is no one answer for all occasions. It really depends on how the baby is growing and how the mother processes her diet, because everyone's calories are processed differently.”

The researchers note that these guidelines can be used to advise women, but they are not useful in predicting the risk of complications during pregnancy in an individual woman. The main problem is that, before conception, most women do not go to the doctor to discuss risk factors when planning a pregnancy.

Popular by topic