Colon Cancer Vaccine Successfully Passed First Trials

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Colon Cancer Vaccine Successfully Passed First Trials
Colon Cancer Vaccine Successfully Passed First Trials

Video: Colon Cancer Vaccine Successfully Passed First Trials

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Video: Colon Cancer Vaccine Phase I Clinical Trial 2023, February
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Colon cancer vaccine successfully passed first trials

The results of the first round of human testing of a colorectal cancer vaccine have been promising. Scientists concluded that the vaccine is safe and stimulates the activation of the immune system. This paves the way for the second phase of her clinical research. The research results were published in the Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer.

Colon cancer vaccine successfully passed first trials
Colon cancer vaccine successfully passed first trials

Photo: pixabay.com /

The results of the first round of human testing of a colorectal cancer vaccine have been promising. Scientists concluded that the vaccine is safe and stimulates the activation of the immune system. This paves the way for the second phase of her clinical research. The research results were published in the Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer.

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death. It is difficult to diagnose in the early stages, and many modern methods of treatment are not effective enough for it. Almost half of the patients do not survive due to the tendency of the cancer to relapse even after surgical resection.

The new vaccine should stimulate the patient's immune system to destroy cancer cells. Tumor cells are known to be cunning enough to bypass immune defenses. We can say that immunotherapy "trains" the immune system to recognize and destroy them when they appear in the body.

This vaccine was made possible by the discovery that nearly all colorectal cancers express a molecule called GUCY2C. However, this molecule is also found in intestinal epithelial cells, so any vaccine aimed at it should direct the body's immune response only to tumor tissues and not to normal ones.

This is the first human trial of a vaccine to determine the safety of the treatment. Ten patients with stage 1 and 2 colorectal cancer received the vaccine and were followed up for six months. The results were positive, with no serious side effects. The blood test also showed that the vaccine successfully increased the activity of specific anti-tumor immune cells, suggesting that the treatment elicits the desired immune response.

The next phase of the study is to move to larger Phase 2 studies with more patients. Based on the data obtained during the first phase, the researchers have already modified the vaccine, which should be more effective in stimulating the response of the immune system. There is also hope that this vaccine will be effective not only for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Recent studies have shown that the GUCY2C molecule is also expressed in cancers of the stomach, esophagus and pancreas, which means that the new vaccine could be useful in fighting a wide variety of common cancers.

"The aim of the new study, which will begin this fall, is to show that the 2.0 vaccine is even better and could benefit a much larger group of cancer patients," said study author Adam Snook.

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