Taking Antibiotics In Adulthood Increases The Risk Of Heart Attack And Stroke In Women

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Taking Antibiotics In Adulthood Increases The Risk Of Heart Attack And Stroke In Women
Taking Antibiotics In Adulthood Increases The Risk Of Heart Attack And Stroke In Women

Video: Taking Antibiotics In Adulthood Increases The Risk Of Heart Attack And Stroke In Women

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Video: Antibiotics And Cardiovascular Risk 2023, January
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Taking antibiotics in adulthood increases the risk of heart attack and stroke in women

The risk of heart attack and stroke in women over 60 years of age who have taken antibiotics for more than two months is 32% higher than in women who have not taken antibiotics. In middle-aged women, the risk is lower.

Taking antibiotics in adulthood increases the risk of heart attack and stroke in women
Taking antibiotics in adulthood increases the risk of heart attack and stroke in women

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Women who take antibiotics for an extended period of time are at increased risk of heart attack and stroke, a new study published in the European Heart Journal showed.

The study involved 36,500 women. His data suggests that women aged 60 and older who took antibiotics for two months or more had the highest risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Long-term antibiotic use was also associated with an increased risk for middle-aged women (40-59 years). However, scientists found no increased risk from antibiotic use in young women between the ages of 20 and 39.

The study's lead author, Professor Lu Qi of Tulane University in the US, says that a possible reason antibiotic use is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease is that antibiotics alter the balance of microorganisms in the gut, destroying the “good »Probiotic bacteria, increasing the spread of viruses, bacteria and other microorganisms that can cause disease.

“The use of antibiotics is the most important factor in changing the balance of microorganisms in the gut. Previous research has shown links between changes in the gut microbiotic environment and inflammation, narrowing of blood vessels, stroke and heart disease,”said Lu Qi.

Scientists studied 36,429 women in the nursing health study, looking at data from 2004 to June 2012. In 2004, women were 60 years of age or older and were asked about antibiotic use in their youth (20-39 years), middle age (40-59) and beyond (60 years and older). The researchers divided them into four groups: those who never took antibiotics, those who took them for less than 15 days, from 15 days to two months, for two months or longer.

The women were then followed for eight years, with antibiotic questions every two years. During this period, 1,056 study participants developed cardiovascular disease.

After adjusting for other factors that could influence the results, the researchers found that women who took antibiotics for more than two months in adulthood were 32% more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than women who did not take antibiotics.

Women who took antibiotics for more than two months in middle age had a 28% increased risk compared to women who did not take antibiotics at all.

These data mean that among women who take antibiotics for two months or more in adulthood, 6 in 1000 develop cardiovascular disease, compared with 3 in 1000 among women who did not take antibiotics.

The most common reasons for antibiotic use were respiratory infections, urinary tract infections, and dental problems.

Professor Lu Qi said research shows that antibiotics should only be used when they are really needed. Given the potential for cumulative side effects, the shorter the time you take antibiotics, the better.

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