Scientists: Risk Of Vaccine Allergy Is Extremely Low

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Scientists: Risk Of Vaccine Allergy Is Extremely Low
Scientists: Risk Of Vaccine Allergy Is Extremely Low

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Scientists: Risk of vaccine allergy is extremely low

The likelihood of an allergic reaction to vaccines is extremely low (1: 760,000), but even if available, an allergist can ensure safe vaccination.

Scientists: Risk of vaccine allergy is extremely low
Scientists: Risk of vaccine allergy is extremely low

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The likelihood of an allergic reaction to vaccines is extremely low (1: 760,000), but even if available, an allergist can ensure safe vaccination.

The Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) publishes five facts about vaccine allergy compiled by two McMaster University physicians, Derek Chu, Clinical Immunology and Allergy Research Fellow, and Zainab Abdurrahman, Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Pediatrics.

So what you need to know about vaccine allergy:

1. Allergy to vaccines mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) is extremely rare. This reaction occurs in about 1 in 760,000 vaccinations.

It manifests itself in the form of urticaria, angioedema, dyspnea, or anaphylaxis. The reaction is manifested within minutes after vaccination, its reaction is likely.

2. The most common side effects of vaccines are fever, local pain / irritation / redness, or swelling. They are not signs of allergies.

With live vaccines, side effects may be delayed up to 7–21 days after immunization; this includes vaccine-induced hives with delayed onset, which are commonly mistaken for allergies

3. With the exception of yellow fever vaccine, egg allergy is not a reason for not being vaccinated.

Influenza (live and inactivated), chickenpox, rabies, and MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccines contain very small amounts of egg white, according to the Public Health Agencies of the United States and Canada, and the Canadian Pediatric Society. They are safe for day-to-day use in egg allergy patients, so no special assessment or special precautions are required.

4. Allergies to vaccines are generally unpredictable and vaccine-specific. Common exceptions include

an allergy to gelatin (eg, gummy bears, jelly dessert powder, marshmallow), which can cause an allergic reaction to MMR vaccines, chickenpox, or Japanese encephalitis;

  • egg allergy and yellow fever vaccine;
  • Latex allergy (exposure to rubber stoppers on multi-dose vials or in some pre-filled syringes).

5. Even in the case of an actual allergy to the vaccine, a safe vaccination is often possible.

Allergists can make it easier to immunize patients with vaccine allergies through techniques such as staged administration. Potential allergy to vaccines should not interfere with seeking medical attention.

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