Sugar Lowers Focus And Promotes Fatigue

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Sugar Lowers Focus And Promotes Fatigue
Sugar Lowers Focus And Promotes Fatigue
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Sugar lowers focus and promotes fatigue

The idea that sugar can improve mood is ubiquitous in popular culture to the point that people around the world consume sugary drinks to become more alert or fight fatigue. Research results indicate that such claims are unfounded - sugar is more likely to make you feel worse.

Sugar lowers focus and promotes fatigue
Sugar lowers focus and promotes fatigue

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Sugar does not improve mood, but, on the contrary, reduces concentration and increases feelings of fatigue, according to a joint study by the University of Warwick, Humboldt University Berlin, and Lancaster University, published in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews.

“The idea that sugar can improve mood is ubiquitous in popular culture to the point that people around the world consume sugary drinks to become more alert or fight fatigue. Our results show very clearly that such claims are groundless - if anything, sugar is more likely to make you feel worse,”said Dr. Konstantinos Mantantzis of the Humboldt University of Berlin, who led the study.

The team explored the sugar euphoria myth using data from 31 published studies involving 1259 adults. They analyzed the effects of sugar on various aspects of mood, including anger, concentration, depression, and fatigue.

It also looked at the effects of factors such as the amount and type of sugar consumed on mood and stressful mental and physical stress.

The researchers found:

sugar consumption, regardless of the amount, does not actually affect either mood or the facilitation of subsequent mental or physical activity;

  • people who consumed sugar during the hour felt more tired and less attentive than those who did not;
  • the concept of "sugar euphoria" is a myth in which there is not even a grain of truth.

“We hope our findings will help dispel the sugar euphoria myth and serve as a basis for public health policies to reduce sugar consumption,” commented Professor Elizabeth Maylor of the University of Warwick.

“The rise in obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome in recent years underscores the need for evidence-based nutritional strategies to promote healthy lifestyles throughout life. Our results show that sugary drinks or snacks do not provide a quick “fuel replenishment” to make us feel more energized,”added Dr. Sandra Sünram-Lea of ​​Lancaster University.

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