Influenza Vaccination Does Not Increase The Risk Of Miscarriage

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Influenza Vaccination Does Not Increase The Risk Of Miscarriage
Influenza Vaccination Does Not Increase The Risk Of Miscarriage

Video: Influenza Vaccination Does Not Increase The Risk Of Miscarriage

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Video: Flu Vac in the Pandemic 2023, February
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Influenza vaccination does not increase the risk of miscarriage

“For women who are now wondering if it is safe to get vaccinated early in pregnancy, we can say unequivocally,“Yes, it’s safe.”

Influenza vaccination does not increase the risk of miscarriage
Influenza vaccination does not increase the risk of miscarriage

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Getting the flu vaccine during pregnancy does not increase the risk of miscarriage, a new study from the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found. This is reported by Stat News.

The encouraging finding contradicts earlier research by the same group of scientists on the safety of getting the flu shot during pregnancy.

A review of the results of the new study was presented at a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which sets the CDC's vaccination policy.

The study involved 1455 women (three times more than in the previous one). It was specifically designed to address this issue, prompting scientists to express confidence in the new results.

“For women who are now wondering if it is safe to vaccinate early in pregnancy, we can say unequivocally, 'Yes, it is safe,'” said Dr. Edward Belongia, research team member, head of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and public health at the Marshfield Clinic in Wisconsin (Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health at Wisconsin's Marshfield Clinic).

The first study of this group, based on data from 2005–2006 and 2006–2007, found no association between influenza shots and miscarriages. However, after the 2009 pandemic, they re-examined the issue. The cause was a new type of virus that caused this pandemic (H1N1), first included in the annual flu shot in the 2010-2011 season.

A second study published in 2017 found an unexpected wake-up call. Among pregnant women vaccinated against the flu, it appears that some were at higher risk of miscarriage - having been vaccinated for two consecutive years, with the last vaccination being 28 days before the miscarriage. Women who were vaccinated only in their year of pregnancy did not appear to be at increased risk.

All studies were observational (data on pregnant women were studied, who themselves decided whether to vaccinate or not), so a causal relationship cannot be identified. One can only conclude that there is a link as such between the flu shot early in pregnancy and an increased risk of miscarriage.

Observational studies should be viewed with some caution, as unforeseen factors can influence the outcome. In the case of the previous study, it is possible that the association found was actually false - a statistical fluke caused by some unknown confounding factor.

Only 485 women participated in it, and the group where this connection was manifested was very small - 14 women who were vaccinated for two years in a row had a miscarriage. Therefore, when the numbers are so small, one should be careful in interpreting any results.

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