The Harm Of Alcohol To Young People Is Greatly Underestimated

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The Harm Of Alcohol To Young People Is Greatly Underestimated
The Harm Of Alcohol To Young People Is Greatly Underestimated
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The harm of alcohol to young people is greatly underestimated

While some studies point to some benefits of moderate alcohol consumption, they tend to cover people aged 50 and over. However, this automatically excludes anyone who has died before age 50 due to alcohol use.

The harm of alcohol to young people is greatly underestimated
The harm of alcohol to young people is greatly underestimated

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The risks of alcohol consumption, especially for young people, are seriously underestimated. This is stated in a new study published by a scientist at the Boston Medical Center in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

Although some observational studies suggest some benefits of moderate alcohol consumption, they tend to include people aged 50 and over. However, this automatically excludes anyone who has died before age 50 due to alcohol use.

Simply put, the deceased do not participate in the study. According to the study, over 40% of all alcohol deaths occur before the age of 50. This suggests that the majority of modern scientific works underestimate the risk of alcohol consumption, since not the full age spectrum is taken into account, and, therefore, they are not sufficiently representative.

The researchers used data from government statistics on causes of death and disease payments between 2006 and 2010 in the United States.

Based on these data, the authors found that age is a significant factor in mortality from alcohol use. About 35.8% of total alcohol-related deaths occurred between the ages of 20 and 49. And only 4.5% of deaths were averted due to alcohol use in this age group. The over 65 age group accounts for approximately 35% of alcohol-related deaths.

A similar picture emerged when researchers looked at the predicted life expectancy shortened by alcohol consumption. As it turned out, alcohol consumption affects people aged 20-49 most of all (58.4% of the total number of “lost” years of life), while in the age group over 65, only 15%.

Overall, according to the authors, their results show that young people are “more likely to die from alcohol use than from a lack of alcohol,” while older people are more likely to experience some of the health benefits of moderate alcohol use.

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