Speech Stereotypes: Not All Cancer Patients Want To Be "brave Fighters"

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Speech Stereotypes: Not All Cancer Patients Want To Be "brave Fighters"
Speech Stereotypes: Not All Cancer Patients Want To Be "brave Fighters"

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Speech stereotypes: not all cancer patients want to be "brave fighters"

Cancer patients in the press and in society are often called heroes, fighters [against cancer], sometimes other pathetic allegories are cited. It turns out that many people who are ill do not like this, they often find such words rather inappropriate than supportive.

Speech stereotypes: not all cancer patients want to be
Speech stereotypes: not all cancer patients want to be

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Cancer patients in the press and in society are often called heroes, fighters [against cancer], sometimes other pretentious allegories are cited. It turns out that many people who are ill do not like this, they often find such words rather inappropriate than supportive.

A poll conducted in England by the Macmillan Cancer Support charity found that cancer patients, among other things, consider words like "victim" and "suffering" as unloved.

The charity notes that the survey showed how differently descriptions of cancer can be perceived.

Describing someone's cancer case with the words "war" or "battle" and indicating that death was lost was also unpopular among those surveyed, according to the BBC.

The survey involved 2,000 people who have ever been diagnosed with cancer. It is noted that the main sources of such a dubious and offensive language for some are articles in the media and posts on social networks.

The survey showed that cancer patients themselves find it most appropriate to use common, factual, vocabulary to describe illness and death.

The BBC, in its material on the issue, quotes the words of some patients.

“I think talking about cancer can carry a lot of negative pressures. “Brave,” “fighter,” “fighter,” and other standard descriptions put a lot of pressure on people who have recently been diagnosed with cancer,”says Mandy Mahoney, 47, diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. “I'm not 'brave' or 'inspiring', I'm just trying to spend the rest of my life well,” she added.

A more compromise opinion was expressed by powerlifter Craig Toli, who is currently in remission after treatment for thyroid cancer. He said that words like "fight" and "wrestler" can be interpreted differently. So, they helped him to hold out, faced with cancer. “Everyone loves wrestling stories,” he added.

“By drawing attention to this, we want to encourage people to talk more about what words they would rather hear and stop the harmful effects of words on health and relationships,” said Karen Roberts, chief cancer nurse at Macmillan Cancer Support.

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