Pessimism And Aggressiveness Contribute To The Development Of Diabetes

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Pessimism And Aggressiveness Contribute To The Development Of Diabetes
Pessimism And Aggressiveness Contribute To The Development Of Diabetes
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Pessimism and aggressiveness contribute to the development of diabetes

A new American study found that certain personality traits can increase or decrease a woman's risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Pessimism and aggressiveness contribute to the development of diabetes
Pessimism and aggressiveness contribute to the development of diabetes

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A new American study found that certain personality traits can increase or decrease a woman's risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Family history, obesity, unhealthy diet, and low physical activity are considered risk factors for diabetes. However, new evidence indicates that depression and cynicism are also associated with an increased risk of illness. In addition, high levels of hostility have been linked to high fasting glucose, insulin resistance, and the spread of diabetes.

In a new study, based on data from the American Women's Health Initiative survey, researchers tried to find out if personality traits such as optimism, negative attitudes and hostility are associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in women after menopause.

Scientists also looked at whether this link could be mediated by factors such as diet, physical activity, smoking, or high alcohol consumption.

The study, published in the journal Menopause, involved 139,924 postmenopausal women (ages 50 to 79) who did not have diabetes at the start of the study. During 14 years of follow-up, 19,240 cases of type 2 diabetes were identified.

The researchers compared the most optimistic women with the pessimists, finding that the more optimistic women had a 12% lower risk of developing diabetes.

The researchers also compared women with the lowest levels of emotional expression and hostility and women with the highest levels of these qualities. It turned out that the more hostile women had a higher risk of developing diabetes. However, the association of hostility with the risk of developing diabetes was stronger in women who were not obese than in women with obesity.

The authors concluded that pessimism, high degree of negative attitudes and hostility were associated with an increased risk of diabetes in postmenopausal women. Their data will help identify women at high risk of developing diabetes more easily and will be helpful in planning preventive measures, the study authors said.

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