One In Five Patients Are Shy About Reporting Cancer Symptoms To Their Doctor

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One In Five Patients Are Shy About Reporting Cancer Symptoms To Their Doctor
One In Five Patients Are Shy About Reporting Cancer Symptoms To Their Doctor

Video: One In Five Patients Are Shy About Reporting Cancer Symptoms To Their Doctor

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One in five patients are shy about reporting cancer symptoms to their doctor

Millions of people with symptoms that might talk about cancer avoid doctors because they are ashamed to talk about it. The most inconvenient for discussion are symptoms from intimate areas and associated with going to the toilet.

One in five patients are shy about reporting cancer symptoms to their doctor
One in five patients are shy about reporting cancer symptoms to their doctor

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Millions of people with symptoms that might talk about cancer avoid doctors because they are ashamed to talk about it. These are the results of a survey carried out by the major British insurance company Bupa.

According to the data obtained, one in five adults refuses to seek medical help, embarrassed to talk about symptoms manifested in intimate areas. That is, in England alone, millions of people thus lose the opportunity for early diagnosis and effective treatment of cancer.

According to Bupa, a survey of cancer statistics and several surveys, for women, the most “undesirable” to discuss with a doctor was vaginal bleeding. Also, patients do not like to talk about pain in the pelvic or scrotum, pain and bleeding while using the toilet and other similar symptoms.

30% of people preferred to try to understand their condition using the Internet, and 36% asked friends for advice. With these symptoms, people did not seek help for an average of almost 10 weeks. About half of these people report not knowing where to start talking with their doctor about their condition. One in five people see a doctor only under pressure from a partner.

Helen Dutton, Cancer Nurse at Bupa, reminds all shy people:

Remember, doctors have heard of these things many times. Even if your symptoms are unusual for you, doctors have probably dealt with similar ones. It is their job to understand what is happening to your body.

  • Find your comfort zone. For example, if you find it difficult to discuss symptoms with a doctor of the opposite gender, select a doctor of your gender.
  • Put your concerns on paper. If you find it difficult to describe your symptoms, a pen and paper will help you. You may also feel more at ease if your doctor just reads about them.

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