What Day Of The Week Is The Highest Risk Of Cardiac Arrest? It's Not Monday Morning Anymore

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What Day Of The Week Is The Highest Risk Of Cardiac Arrest? It's Not Monday Morning Anymore
What Day Of The Week Is The Highest Risk Of Cardiac Arrest? It's Not Monday Morning Anymore

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What day of the week is the highest risk of cardiac arrest? It's not Monday morning anymore

Until now, it was believed that sudden cardiac arrest most often occurs on Monday morning. However, a group of American scientists have shown that this is no longer the case. They believe that the reason for this was a change in the rhythm of life and new methods of treatment.

What day of the week is the highest risk of cardiac arrest? It's not Monday morning anymore
What day of the week is the highest risk of cardiac arrest? It's not Monday morning anymore

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Until now, it was believed that sudden cardiac arrest most often occurs on Monday morning. However, a group of American scientists who published their scientific work in the journal Heart Rhythm showed that this is no longer the case.

"All textbooks say that sudden cardiac arrest occurs most often in the early morning hours," said one of the study's authors, Dr. Sumeet Chugh, director of the Heart Rate Center at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

His research team examined data on 2,631 sudden deaths in Oregon. Most often (31.6%), cardiac arrest occurred in the afternoon, 27.6% in the morning, 26.9% in the evening, and only 13.9% in the early morning.

The researchers focused on sudden cardiac arrest and electrical abnormalities in the heart, not myocardial infarction, although both can happen at the same time.

Dr. Chug believes there are several reasons for this change in rush hour death from sudden cardiac arrest. Including he calls an increase in the accuracy of observations. It also plays a role in changing the treatment of patients at risk of sudden cardiac arrest. He believes that drugs or other therapies can affect the shift in the peak hours of death. Another factor may be a change in the very rhythm of human life.

“Over the past 10-20 years, people's behavior has really changed a lot. Our work rhythm has changed, we are constantly in touch. I would call this a "always on state". Many people work all the time or are tied to their smartphones almost every moment of the day or even night,”says Dr. Chug.

This change in the rhythm of life can lead to disturbances in circadian rhythms and exposure to stress throughout the day.

The findings of this study are supported by a number of previous studies, which also indicate a shift in the peak hours of death by daytime. In addition, Dr. Chug's research says Monday is no longer the day when sudden cardiac arrest occurs most often. According to him, there is no sharp increase in such cases on Mondays, and a relatively small increase is observed on Sundays. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 70 to 90% of patients with sudden cardiac arrest die before they are admitted to hospital. Research aimed at determining peak hours of death helps plan health care schedules.

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